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Minnesota

Hunting

Deer Hunting Regulations

NEW—deer hunting information

  • Special CWD regulations, including mandatory disease testing and carcass movement restrictions are in effect in a number of areas.
  • Deer permit areas 110, 184 197, 233, 342, and 169 west of Highway 6 have been added to the CWD surveillance zone.
  • Bag limit labels have changed:
    • Lottery is now antlerless permit lottery
    • hunter choice is now either sex
    • managed is now two-deer limit
    • intensive is now. three-deer limit
    • unlimited antlerless is now five-deer limit
  • The early antlerless deer season has been expanded to include more deer permit areas.
  • Several changes to permit area boundaries are depicted on the 2021 Deer Season Area Map. Affected permit areas include 169, 171, 172, 173, 179, 184, 197, 237, 259, 275, 276, 277, 281, 282, 283, and 295. Find precise detail in the online interactive deer map at mndnr.gov/hunting/deer/map.html.
  • The Camp Ripley Archery Hunt is a three-day hunt, October 29 - 31. Applicants must apply for the lottery by August 20.
  • Late CWD hunts will be held in DPAs 343, 605, 643, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, and 655, December 17 - 19 and December 31 - January 2.

Deer—General

Legal buck and antlerless deer

  • Legal bucks have one antler at least 3 inches long.
  • Fawn bucks, sometimes called button bucks are not legal bucks. • Antlerless deer are deer without an antler at least 3 inches long.

License purchase and validity

All deer licenses (archery, firearms, muzzleloader) and bonus permits may be purchased at any time before or during the season. After a deer season is open, all licenses and permits are valid the same day of purchase if purchased before legal shooting hours. If the license or permit is purchased after legal shooting hours have begun, it is valid the following day.

  • A person may purchase no more than one firearms, muzzleloader, and archery deer license in a calendar year.
  • Bonus, early antlerless season, and disease management permits may be purchased in addition to regular licenses. Bonus permits may be purchased throughout the season, but must be in possession when taking deer. Regular licenses and bonus permits may be used in any order. For more information on the early antlerless season, including what areas are open.
  • A person may not take or tag deer without the appropriate license or permit. The term “take” includes attempting to take deer, deer drives, spotting, or otherwise assisting another person in taking deer.

Hunting method restrictions—hunting deer with bait is illegal

Hunters are not allowed to take deer with the aid or use of bait. “Taking” includes attempting to take.

Baiting

  • Baiting significantly increases the risk of disease transmission by concentrating animals and promoting nose-to-nose contact.
  • Baiting attracts and holds large numbers of deer on private parcels creating a privatization of the deer herd.
  • Bait piles alter a deer’s natural movement. By placing bait, one hunter can effectively nullify another hunter’s attempt to harvest a deer.

Baiting—means placing, exposing, depositing, distributing, or scattering bait that is capable of attracting or enticing deer.

What is bait?

Bait—includes grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, hay, or other food that is capable of attracting or enticing deer and has been placed by a person.

Liquid scents (example: doe in heat), sprays, salt, and minerals are not bait if they do not contain liquid or solid food products.

Read the ingredient label on all products prior to use. Many products, including newer liquid, powder and block forms, contain food or attractants such as grains, fruits, and sugar derivatives (glucose, dextrose, and fructose). If a salt or mineral product has anything other than salt or mineral in it, it is illegal to use for hunting.

Agricultural crops from normal or accepted farming, forest management, wildlife food plantings, orchard management, or other similar land management activities are not bait. This exclusion does not apply to agricultural crops that have been reintroduced and concentrated where a person is hunting. Example: A person may spread an abundant agricultural crop on a previously planted field as fertilizer. However, if the fertilizer is piled or concentrated where the person is hunting deer, it is baiting.

A person otherwise in compliance with this section who is hunting on private or public property that is adjacent to the property where bait or food is present is not in violation if the person has not participated in, been involved with, or agreed to baiting or feeding wildlife on the adjacent property.

Removal of bait

All bait must be completely removed for 10 days prior to hunting.

Penalties for baiting violations—revocation and confiscation

  • A person may not obtain any deer license or take deer under a lifetime license for 1 year after the person is convicted of hunting deer with the aid or use of bait. A second conviction within 3 years would result in a 3-year revocation. The revocation period doubles if the conviction is for a deer that is a trophy deer scoring higher than 170.
  • Firearms and bows used to take deer with the aid or use of bait will be seized and are subject to confiscation upon conviction. In some areas, deer feeding and attractants are banned year-round.

Elevated stands

Special regulations regarding elevated stands apply to wildlife management areas, state forests, state parks and state recreation areas that are open to hunting.

Party hunting

  • A “party” is defined as any group of two or more licensed deer hunters who are all afield; hunting together at the same time; and all using firearms (including muzzleloaders) or all using archery.
  • Party members who are not afield hunting with the individual who takes a deer at the time it is taken may not legally tag that deer.
  • The person whose license is being used on the deer must be at the site of kill and must validate the site tag before the deer is moved from the site of the kill.
  • Hunters may not lend licenses to or borrow licenses from other hunters.
  • A mixed group of firearms and archery hunters is considered two separate parties.
  • Crossbow hunters may not party hunt with firearms or archery hunters.
  • Crossbow hunters may party hunt with archery hunters if they possess an archery license with a crossbow disability permit or are age 60 or over and hunting with a crossbow.
  • Any member of a party may kill a deer for any other member of the party who has an unused tag valid for that deer.
  • The following exceptions apply: Party members may not kill an antlerless deer in an antlerless permit lottery area for: 1) a member of the party who is a resident under age 18; 2) a person with a disability authorized to take antlerless deer under a permit to shoot from a motor vehicle; or 3) a resident of a Minnesota State Veterans’ Home.

Party hunting regulation

The intent of the party hunting regulation is to prevent parties from shooting more deer than the available number of tags. The party hunting regulation requires that all hunters who intend to tag deer for each other be hunting together, in the field, at the time the deer are taken.

Accessible hunting seasons

Accessible deer hunts organized by Capable Partners, Access North and Midwest Outdoors Unlimited, are being scheduled for this fall. For more information call the DNR Information Center at 888-MINNDNR (646-6367).

Persons who are totally blind may use a laser sight to participate in permitted assisted hunting opportunities.

How to tag your deer and validate your site tag

Your deer license and site tag comes as a two-part form. The upper half is the site tag for tagging the deer in the field. The lower half is the deer license and registration slip.

At the site of the kill

The licensed hunter whose tag is being used on the deer must:

How to tag your deer and validate your site tag
  • Detach the site tag from the deer license/registration slip.
  • Before moving the deer, the hunter whose tag is being used must validate the tag by using a knife or similar sharp object to cut out the notches indicating the month, date and time of day the deer was killed (AM/PM).
  • If more than one month, date, or time is cut out or marked, the tag becomes invalid.

Moving your deer

A person may move a lawfully taken deer from the site of the kill without attaching the validated tag to the animal only while in the act of manually or mechanically dragging, carrying, or carting the animal across the ground and while possessing the validated tag on their person.

The validated tag must be attached to the deer when the deer is placed on a motor vehicle or an ATV, a vehicle or a trailer being towed by an ATV or brought into a camp, yard or other place of habitation.

Attaching the tag

The tag must be secured to the deer around the base of an antler, through a slit cut in either ear, or between the tendon and bone of a hind leg with a zip tie, piece of wire or string.

The tag must remain attached to the deer until processed for storage.

Deer carcass disposal

Hunters who process their own deer may not dispose of carcasses on public land, including wildlife management areas, state forests, road rights of way, or in any water body. Deer carcasses may be disposed of in the following ways:

  • On private land with the permission of the landowner.
  • Through your refuse hauler after checking on how to properly bag the carcass.
  • At a local landfill.

The use of carcasses or parts of carcasses as bait for trapping remains legal within applicable laws, however, the unlawful deposit of carcasses not associated with legal baiting or field dressing constitutes litter.

Registration and transportation

Registration

Every deer taken must be registered and antlers must remain attached until the deer is registered. In all cases, the deer must be registered within 48 hours after the deer was taken and before the deer is processed either privately or commercially. Deer may be transported out of the area where taken without first being registered, except in 600-series deer permit areas and the CWD control zone where carcass movement restrictions are in place. There are three registration options:

1. Walk-in Big Game Registration Stations—Registration stations display large, orange “Big Game Registration” signs. The person whose tag is on the deer must personally present the deer at an official registration station and receive a big game possession tag. The tag must be attached to the hind leg, ear, or antler where the site tag was attached. You can find a complete list of all stations at any DNR wildlife office or on the DNR website.

2. Telephone—You will need a pen to record a confirmation number to complete the registration. Follow the steps below. They are also printed on your deer license.

  1. Dial 888-706-6367 to get into the system.
  2. Enter the nine-digit harvest registration number on the license. This is the large and bold number printed on your deer license and is NOT your MNDNR number.
  3. Enter the three-digit area where the deer was killed. The system will only accept valid deer permit areas or special hunt numbers.
  4. Enter the date the deer was killed.
  5. Enter the type of deer—adult male, adult female, fawn male, fawn female.
  6. You will receive a confirmation number that must be written on the license and site tag in the appropriate area.

3. Online—Connect to mndnr.gov/hunting to register your deer. The questions will be identical to phone registration. You will receive a confirmation number, which must be recorded on the license and site tag in the appropriate area.

Telephone and internet deer registration

Persons who register by phone or internet do not receive a separate big game possession tag. When the system asks for deer type, please use the following information:

  • Adult male—male deer with antlers at least 3 inches long.
  • Fawn male—6-month-old male deer, commonly known as a “button buck” weighs less than 75 pounds dressed.
  • Adult female—doe at least 18 months old. Longer nose and larger body (over 75 pounds dressed weight) than younger antlerless deer.
  • Fawn female—6-month-old female deer. Shorter nose, weighs less than 75 pounds dressed. Register buck with antlers less than 3 inches or shed antlers as fawn male.

A harvest registration number can only be used once. The system will not accept multiple registrations using the same number.

You will only be asked questions valid to your license. Here are a few examples:

  • Regular Firearms License—Will ask all four deer types but will not ask season because it’s only valid during the firearm season. The same applies to muzzleloader,

    archery, lifetime, etc.

  • Bonus Permits—Will only ask three deer types (adult female, fawn male, fawn female) but will also ask season (archery, firearm, muzzleloader).

Big game registration stations

Big game registration provides essential information for managing deer populations. Registration station owners in the state donate the use of their business and the time of their staff to help collect this information. Station operators are not required to inspect deer or verify registration information. This is the hunter’s responsibility.

Transportation

A legally registered animal may be transported any time during and after the deer hunting season. Carcass movement restrictions apply in some CWD areas. See the 2021 Deer Season Area Map.

  • The licensee must accompany the deer in transport except as follows: A deer that has been registered may be transported by another person, if the signature, address, and license number of the licensee and the origin and destination of the transport are written on the back of the possession tag, the site tag, or a separate tag the licensee provides.
  • All deer in transport must be readily accessible for inspection by DNR conservation officers.
  • The head of a deer must remain attached to the carcass until the deer is registered. Skin and entrails may be removed before registration. Deer may be quartered before being registered, but the animal’s head must remain attached to one of the quarters.

Statewide bag limits for deer

Although hunters can buy archery, firearm and muzzleloader licenses, the bag limits may not allow all three tags to be filled in a single deer area. It is the hunter’s responsibility to know the bag limit for the areas they hunt. The statewide bag limit for deer is five. Deer harvested during the early antlerless season and the late CWD hunts do not count toward the statewide bag limit. The statewide bag limit for legal bucks is one, except in deer permit areas 643, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, and 655. Deer harvested in special hunts do not contribute to the bag limit within the surrounding deer permit area; however, they do contribute to the statewide limit.

Landowner Licensee Farms—Landowner licensees may take one antlerless deer in addition to the statewide bag limit for either-sex, two-deer limit, three-deer limit, or five-deer limit permit areas.

Application for antlerless permits in antlerless lottery deer areas

The bag limit in antlerless lottery areas for firearms and muzzleloader hunters is one deer, which must be an antlered buck unless hunters apply for and receive an antlerless permit in the lottery. The permit gives hunters the choice of taking either a legal buck or an antlerless deer. Those exempt from the lottery include:

  • Residents of Minnesota State Veterans’ Homes
  • Residents age 84 and older
  • Youth under age 18
  • Hunters who have a permit to shoot deer from a stationary vehicle.

Only hunters authorized above may shoot and tag the antlerless deer in an antlerless permit lottery area (no party hunting).

A hunter can apply using both a firearm and muzzleloader license; but may only enter one lottery per license. The application deadline is Thursday, September 9.
All hunters who purchase a firearms or muzzleloader license, and declare an antlerless permit lottery area by September 9 will be automatically entered into the lottery for an antlerless permit.

  • Successful applicants will receive a postcard in the mail authorizing them to take an antlerless deer using their regular license in that antlerless permit lottery area. The authorization will be valid for both the firearm or muzzleloader season; however, you must still have a valid license for that season.
  • Antlerless permit holders may take antlerless deer only in the area specified on the permit, but they may hunt deer anywhere during the season indicated on the license.
  • Information regarding permit allocations is on the 2021 Deer Season Area Map.
  • Leftover antlerless deer permits will be available first come, first served beginning at 5 p.m. on October 4. Leftover permits are available to any hunter who has a valid license but has not been selected.
  • Permits are allocated in proportion to the license types in the lottery. For example, if 100 antlerless deer permits are allocated and 25% of the applicants are muzzleloader hunters then 25% of the permits will go towards the muzzleloader season. This has the benefit of having muzzleloader-only hunters compete with other muzzleloader-only hunters. They will not compete with firearm hunters who likely have more preference points.

Deer Permit Area Management Designations

DesignationBag limitCan I take an antlerless deer?Can I use a bonus permit to take an antlerless deer?If I am successful, can I take another deer in a different permit area?
Bucks-onlyOne deer, regardless of license type. Only one antlered buck may be taken.No, unless you are a resident of a Minnesota State Veterans’ Home or age 84 or older.NoIn any of the deer permit areas, if the hunter successfully takes a legal deer, they may take an antlerless deer in two-deer, three-deer, or
Antlerless permit lotteryOne deer, regardless of license type. Only one antlered buck may be taken.No, unless you are selected in the lottery for an antlerless permit,
or you are a resident of a Minnesota State Veterans’ Home, or age 84 or older, or under age 18, or a person with a disability with a permit to shoot from a stationary vehicle. Youth and hunters with disabilities must personally take antlerless deer they tag.
NoIn any of the deer permit areas, if the hunter successfully takes a legal deer, they may take an antlerless deer in two-deer, three-deer, or
Either-sexOne deer, regardless of license type. Only one antlered buck may be taken.YesNoIn any of the deer permit areas, if the hunter successfully takes a legal deer, they may take an antlerless deer in two-deer, three-deer, or
Two-deer limitTwo deer, only one antlered buck may be taken.YesYesIn any of the deer permit areas, if the hunter successfully takes a legal deer, they may take an antlerless deer in two-deer, three-deer, or
Three-deer limitThree deer, only one antlered buck may be taken.YesYesIn any of the deer permit areas, if the hunter successfully takes a legal deer, they may take an antlerless deer in two-deer, three-deer, or
Five-deer limitFive deer, only one antlered buck may be taken, except in selected areas.YesYes. In some areas disease management permits may be used.In any of the deer permit areas, if the hunter successfully takes a legal deer, they may take an antlerless deer in two-deer, three-deer, or

    How hunters are selected for antlerless permits and special hunts

    If permit applications exceed the number of permits available, computerized drawings will be used to issue permits.

    • Drawings for antlerless deer or special area permits are based on a preference system. You accumulate preference by applying without getting drawn. Applicants receiving an antlerless deer or special hunt area permit lose their accrued preference.
    • Preference is not affected by applying for a different area than the year before or by not applying for one or more years.
    • Preference for group applications is based on the member with the fewest points.
    • Only successful applicants will be notified.
    • Information about the drawings and individual applications is available by the end of September. Check the DNR website (mndnr.gov) to view results.

    Bonus and disease management permitsBonus and disease management permits are available to archery, firearms, and muzzleloader hunters to take antlerless deer in designated areas.• Bonus permits may be used in two-deer, three-deer, and five-deer limit areas, and almost all special hunts.

    • Disease management permits may only be used in 600-series deer permit areas. Permits are available for $2.50.
    • Hunters must have the appropriate regular license for the area, season, and method they are using before purchasing bonus or disease management permits.
    • Bonus permits are not valid in bucks-only, antlerless permit lottery, or either-sex deer areas.
    • Bonus and disease management permits purchased after the start of shooting hours are valid the next day.
    • A venison donation program is available for hunters that wish to donate harvested deer.

    Landowner deer license

    This free license allows the taking of one additional antlerless deer in either-sex, two-deer limit, three-deer limit, and five-deer limit permit areas for a resident owner, tenant, or nonresident owner of at least 80 acres of agricultural or grazing land. Landowner licenses are valid during any open season; however, the landowner must use the appropriate weapon for that season. This license allows the taking of one additional antlerless deer per farm. A person may receive only one landowner deer license per year. For land with co-owners or co-tenants, only one co-owner or co-tenant may receive a landowner deer license per year. The license is valid only on the land owned or leased for agricultural purposes by the license holder within the deer area where the qualifying land is located. The license holder may give the license to a spouse or dependent. A license issued under this provision does not affect the license-holder’s eligibility to purchase additional deer licenses or permits. A landowner deer license can be used to purchase bonus permits in two-deer limit, three-deer limit, or five-deer limit permit areas or disease management permits in 600-series deer areas. Landowners who obtain this license must allow public deer hunting on their land during the deer hunting season, except for the first Saturday and Sunday of the season. Hunters must obtain permission, and it is up to the landowner how much public hunting is appropriate.

      Chronic Wasting Disease

      Chronic wasting disease (CWD) affects deer, caribou, reindeer, elk and moose.
      Typical signs of the disease include drooping head or ears, incoordination, poor body condition, increased salivation, and excessive thirst or urination. The disease can incubate in deer or other cervids for 11⁄2 to 3 years before deer show any of these clinical symptoms, but deer can still spread disease during this time. CWD is always fatal. In Minnesota, the disease has been detected on a number of deer and elk farms since 2002 and in wild deer since 2010. The DNR uses special CWD zones to contain and test for the disease where it has been found in wild deer and cervid facilities. For more information about CWD and surveillance efforts, visit the website at mndnr.gov/cwd.

      NEW—CWD sample submission is mandatory in all CWD zones during the opening weekend of the firearms A and B seasons
      In CWD management, control and surveillance zones, hunters must provide a sample from deer 1 year or older within 24 hours of harvest during the opening weekend of each of the firearms A and B seasons (except in deer permit areas 213 and 273, where sampling is voluntary until the sampling goal is reached). Sampling stations, either staffed or self-service, will be available in all of these zones.

      Carcass movement restrictions are in effect for CWD management and control zones. Whole carcasses cannot leave these zones until a “not detected” test result is received.

      Sampling information

      • Deer MUST be registered before sampling. Deer will not be registered as part of the sampling process. The hunter must register by telephone, internet, or walk-in registration.
      • Staffed sampling stations will be available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., on Saturday and Sunday of the opening weekend each of the firearms A and B seasons. (Self-service sampling stations will be available at all sampling sites the Mondays following opening weekends to allow compliance with mandatory sampling regulations.)
      • A list of stations is found online at mndnr.gov/cwd.
      • Self-service sampling stations are also available on Saturday through Monday of the opening weekend each of the firearms A and B seasons for mandatory sampling. These stations are open 24 hours.
      • Hunters must comply with carcass movement restrictions for their deer permit area when choosing a sampling station.
      • Self-service sampling information:
        • Self-service sampling stations are available 24 hours a day. A list of stations is found online at mndnr.gov/cwd.
        • If hunters plan to use a self-service sampling station, it is recommended they remove the deer head prior to arriving at the station; however, equipment for removing the head will be available at each station. Deer heads submitted at a self-service sampling station will not be returned to hunters, so hunters who wish to keep antlers must remove them prior to submitting the head. Providing skull-capped deer heads for sampling is OK.
        • Tags will be provided at self-service sampling stations for hunters to write down their contact information and harvest location. Maps will be provided at each station so hunters can locate their deer permit area and the township, range and section where the deer was harvested. Hunters should fill out and attach the larger portion of the tag to the deer head and retain the perforated stub in order to check their test results.
        • Test results will be available online at mndnr.gov/cwdcheck. The time it takes to receive test results will vary depending on testing volume at the diagnostic lab.
        • Hunters can process deer as normal. Hunters should keep processed deer separate and identifiable until test results are received.
        • If a hunter harvests a trophy deer, or would like to retain the head for any reason, they must still submit a sample. The hunter should contact a partnering taxidermist (list is available on the website at mndnr.gov/cwd). Taxidermists will likely charge a fee to cape the deer. Hunters may also collect their own sample by following the instructional video provided on the DNR website, and then place the sample in a plastic baggie and fill out a sample identification tag at a self-service sampling station.

      CWD management zone (DPAs 604, 605, 643, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, 655)

      The CWD management zone (600-series DPAs) was designated due to the detection of CWD in wild deer. The management zone is DPAs 604, 605, 643, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649 and 655. The intent of management strategies in this zone is to limit the potential for disease transmission by increasing hunting opportunities to reduce deer densities, using feeding and attractant bans to reduce contact between deer; and restricting carcass movement. In this zone, sample submission is mandatory during the opening weekend of each of the firearms A and B seasons. If a hunter harvests a deer from one of these areas outside of the opening weekend of firearms and would like to have their deer tested, self-service sampling stations are available.

      In the CWD management zone, the following hunting regulations apply:

      • NEW—Hunters may harvest up to five deer.
      • Antler-point restrictions are removed and cross tagging for antlered bucks is allowed.
      • Carcass movement restrictions apply during all seasons for all deer including fawns. Any whole carcass cannot leave the zone, until a “not detected” test result is received; however, the meat or quarters may leave immediately.
      • Hunters may use either a Statewide (A) or a Late Southeast (B) license during any firearms season and may purchase disease management permits for $2.50 each to take antlerless deer. There are additional license requirements for the early antlerless season.
      • All of these areas except DPA 604 are open during the late CWD hunts in December and January.
      • In DPAs 604 and 605, hunters may harvest only one buck per year. Harvested bucks count toward the five-deer limit.
      • In the southeast part of the state only (DPAs 643, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, and 655). Hunters may harvest up to three legal bucks per year. Hunters can take one buck under an archery license, one buck under a firearms license, and one buck under a muzzleloader license. Bucks taken in these DPAs do not count toward the statewide one buck limit, but do count toward the license limit and the five-deer limit. For example, a hunter can take one buck with a firearms license in DPA 643 and another buck with a muzzleloader license in DPA 171.

      CWD surveillance zone

      The CWD surveillance zone consists of areas where CWD has been found in captive deer or in wild deer in an adjacent area or state. The surveillance zone is DPAs 110, 159, 184, 197, 213, 233, 273, 292, 293, 338, 341, 342, and portions of DPAs 157, 169, 225, 235, 236, and 701. In this zone, sampling is mandatory over the opening weekend of each of the firearms A and B seasons; the only exception is in DPAs 213 and 273, where sampling is voluntary until the sampling goal is reached (check the website

      to see when these goals have been reached). If a hunter harvests a deer from the surveillance zone outside of the opening weekend of firearms and would like to have their deer tested, appointments can be set up at their local wildlife office.

      There are no carcass movement restrictions for deer harvested in this zone.

      Carcass Movement Restrictions

      Carcasses are defined as the head with brain tissue and spinal column of the deer.

      Where was the deer harvested?Carcass movement restrictionsExceptions
      Outside of MinnesotaCarcasses of any deer, elk, or moose species obtained anywhere outside of Minnesota cannot be brought into the state. Nonresidents transporting whole or partial carcasses on a direct route through Minnesota are exempt from this restriction.f those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is bonfedcoautrocr tahastsisecust ainsd wbrapnpend (eidthe,r commercially or privately), 3) Hides and teeth, 4) Antlers or clean (no brain ttisshueatftaochleldo) swkuillnplgateps waitrh tanstlecrsaanttacbhed, and 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      transported into Minnesota or outside of those zones:
      1) Quarters or other portions
      of meat with no part of
      In situations where movement of carcasses is banned, the fotlhloweingsparitnscanlbceotralnuspmortnedointroMhinenaesdotaoroutside of those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no
      attached, 2) Meat that is
      part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is
      boned out or that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or privately), 3) Hides and teeth, 4) Antlers or clean (no brain
      boned out or that is cut and
      tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, and 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      wrapped (either commercially or privately), 3) Hides and
      Intseiteuatiohn,s w4he)reAmnovtemlenrtsofocarcacsslees ias bnanned, the following parts can be transported into Minnesota or outside of those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no
      (no brain tissue attached)
      part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is boned out or that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or psrikvautelyl),p3)lHaidtes asndwteieth, 4a) Antlelres orrsclean (no brain tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, and 5) fainitshtead ctaxhiderdmy, maonundts. 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      In the CWD Management Zone (DPAs 604, 605, 643, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, 655)Carcasses of all deer, including fawns, taken within a CWD Management Zone must remain in the zone boundary until a “not detected” test is confirmed.f those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is bonfedcoautrocr tahastsisecust ainsd wbrapnpend (eidthe,r commercially or privately), 3) Hides and teeth, 4) Antlers or clean (no brain ttisshueatftaochleldo) swkuillnplgateps waitrh tanstlecrsaanttacbhed, and 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      transported into Minnesota or outside of those zones:
      1) Quarters or other portions
      of meat with no part of
      In situations where movement of carcasses is banned, the fotlhloweingsparitnscanlbceotralnuspmortnedointroMhinenaesdotaoroutside of those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no
      attached, 2) Meat that is
      part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is
      boned out or that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or privately), 3) Hides and teeth, 4) Antlers or clean (no brain
      boned out or that is cut and
      tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, and 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      wrapped (either commercially or privately), 3) Hides and
      Intseiteuatiohn,s w4he)reAmnovtemlenrtsofocarcacsslees ias bnanned, the following parts can be transported into Minnesota or outside of those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no
      (no brain tissue attached)
      part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is boned out or that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or psrikvautelyl),p3)lHaidtes asndwteieth, 4a) Antlelres orrsclean (no brain tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, and 5) fainitshtead ctaxhiderdmy, maonundts. 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      In the CWD Control Zone (DPAs 255, 343, 344)Carcasses of all deer, including fawns, taken within a CWD Control Zone must remain in either the CWD Control Zone or the adjacent CWD Management Zone until a “not detected” test is confirmed.f those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is bonfedcoautrocr tahastsisecust ainsd wbrapnpend (eidthe,r commercially or privately), 3) Hides and teeth, 4) Antlers or clean (no brain ttisshueatftaochleldo) swkuillnplgateps waitrh tanstlecrsaanttacbhed, and 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      transported into Minnesota or outside of those zones:
      1) Quarters or other portions
      of meat with no part of
      In situations where movement of carcasses is banned, the fotlhloweingsparitnscanlbceotralnuspmortnedointroMhinenaesdotaoroutside of those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no
      attached, 2) Meat that is
      part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is
      boned out or that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or privately), 3) Hides and teeth, 4) Antlers or clean (no brain
      boned out or that is cut and
      tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, and 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      wrapped (either commercially or privately), 3) Hides and
      Intseiteuatiohn,s w4he)reAmnovtemlenrtsofocarcacsslees ias bnanned, the following parts can be transported into Minnesota or outside of those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no
      (no brain tissue attached)
      part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is boned out or that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or psrikvautelyl),p3)lHaidtes asndwteieth, 4a) Antlelres orrsclean (no brain tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, and 5) fainitshtead ctaxhiderdmy, maonundts. 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      Anywhere in Minnesota outside of the CWD Management and Control ZonesNo carcass movement restrictions exist for deer harvested in permit areas outside the CWD Management and Control Zones in Minnesota. This applies to the CWD Surveillance Zone.
      taxidermy mounts.
      no data
      f those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is bonfedcoautrocr tahastsisecust ainsd wbrapnpend (eidthe,r commercially or privately), 3) Hides and teeth, 4) Antlers or clean (no brain ttisshueatftaochleldo) swkuillnplgateps waitrh tanstlecrsaanttacbhed, and 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      transported into Minnesota or outside of those zones:
      1) Quarters or other portions
      of meat with no part of
      In situations where movement of carcasses is banned, the fotlhloweingsparitnscanlbceotralnuspmortnedointroMhinenaesdotaoroutside of those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no
      attached, 2) Meat that is
      part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is
      boned out or that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or privately), 3) Hides and teeth, 4) Antlers or clean (no brain
      boned out or that is cut and
      tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, and 5) finished taxidermy mounts.
      wrapped (either commercially or privately), 3) Hides and
      Intseiteuatiohn,s w4he)reAmnovtemlenrtsofocarcacsslees ias bnanned, the following parts can be transported into Minnesota or outside of those areas: 1) Quarters or other portions of meat with no
      (no brain tissue attached)
      part of the spinal column or head attached, 2) Meat that is boned out or that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or psrikvautelyl),p3)lHaidtes asndwteieth, 4a) Antlelres orrsclean (no brain tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, and 5) fainitshtead ctaxhiderdmy, maonundts. 5) finished taxidermy mounts.

      Complying with carcass movement restrictions

      To help hunters comply with legal carcass movement restrictions within CWD management or control zones, the DNR will maintain dumpsters where hunters can dispose of deer carcass remains. Dumpster locations and available dates will be listed on mndnr.gov/cwd.

      Deer Feeding Ban

      The feeding and attractant bans described below are likely to be expanded this fall to include additional counties. Details will be announced on the DNR website atmndnr.gov/cwd

      Feeding deer increases the risk of disease transmission. Deer feeding includes placement or distribution of grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, hay and other food that is capable of attracting or enticing deer.

      Deer attractants are natural or manufactured products that are capable of attracting or enticing deer, including salt, minerals, and any product that contains or claims
      to contain cervid urine (example “doe in heat”), blood, gland oil, feces, or other bodily fluid.

      Deer feeding is prohibited in areas where chronic wasting disease was detected in farmed deer. This includes all of Carlton, Chisago, Douglas, Isanti, Kanabec, Pine, Pope, and Stearns counties.

      In addition to deer feeding, deer attractants are prohibited in counties within proximity to where wild deer have been found positive for CWD. This includes Aitkin, Cass, Crow Wing, Dakota, Dodge, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Hennepin, Houston, Hubbard, Mille Lacs, Morrison, Mower, Olmsted, Ramsey, Rice, Scott, Steele, Todd, Wabasha, Wadena, Washington and Winona counties.

      For more information about CWD visit the DNR’s website at mndnr.gov/cwd.

      Counties with Deer Feeding and Attractants Prohibited

      Archery

      Regular archery license: except in bucks-only permit areas, a regular archery license is valid for an either-sex deer statewide in any open area.

      Open areas: Archery hunters can hunt permit areas statewide except in Itasca State Park (deer permit area 287).

      Unless authorized under the Minnesota Personal Protection Act, a person may not possess a firearm while bow hunting for deer.

      Blaze clothing October 21 - 24

      Blaze orange/pink clothing is required during this time. Firearms deer hunting is allowed statewide for the youth deer season and in specific areas for the early antlerless deer season.

      Bag limit and permit area reminder

      Check the management designations and associated bag limits for your permit area on the 2021 Deer Season Area Map insert and online mndnr.gov/hunting/deer/map. html. If you hunt in an antlerless permit lottery, either-sex, two-deer limit, three-deer limit, or five-deer limit permit area, your archery license is valid for an either-sex deer. Bonus permits may only be used to take antlerless deer in two-deer limit, three-deer limit, five-deer limit, and early antlerless permit areas. Disease management permits may be used in select five-deer limit areas.

      Bucks-only areas

      Except for residents over age 84, no antlerless deer may be taken with an archery license in a bucks-only deer area. An archery license is only valid for legal bucks in these areas.

      Venison donation program

      The venison donation allows hunters to donate deer that they have shot for distribution to food shelves at no cost to the hunter. Drop off a deer at any of the participating processors posted on the DNR website. Processing fees are paid from a $1 fee collected from the sale of bonus permits. The DNR and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture fully support deer hunting and the venison donation program. Venison is a healthy source of high-quality protein. Lead contamination can be avoided by using nontoxic ammunition or reduced by using ammunition with high weight retention, such as bonded bullets, and by placing shots in vital areas, away from major muscle groups and liberally trimming meat around the wound channels.

      Early Antlerless Sason and Youth Deer Season

      Open areas early antlerless season: Permit areas 213, 214, 215, 221, 227, 236, 277, 341, 342, 343, 604, 605, 643, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, 655, and 701.

      Open areas youth deer season: Statewide, except Itasca State Park.

      The early antlerless season coincides with the special youth deer season in deer permit areas listed above. The purpose is to provide hunters additional opportunity to manage local deer herds. To participate in the early antlerless season, hunters must possess an archery, firearm or muzzleloader license and at least one valid early antlerless permit. Weapons must match the parent license under which the early antlerless permit is purchased. Youth can take one deer of either sex in early antlerless areas using their youth license. They do not need an early antlerless license unless they continue hunting in an early antlerless season area after their youth license is filled. Bonus permits (and disease management permits in 600-series areas) may be used but hunters must still possess at least one valid early antlerless permit

      to participate. The limit is five deer during the early antlerless season, which is in addition to the statewide bag limit. Party hunting is allowed. Up to five permits may be purchased per person.

      The Whitewater State Game Refuge in Winona County and the surrounding deer permit area (DPA 344) are not open during the early-antlerless season this year. The refuge is open only to youth participating in the Youth Deer Season.

      A venison donation program is available for hunters that wish to donate harvested deer.

      Firearms

      Regular firearm license

      There are two types of regular firearms deer licenses:

      • Statewide (A) season licenses are valid in any area that opens November 6. Hunters are not obligated to stay in any one zone. For example, a person can hunt in deer permit area 343 (nine-day season) opening weekend, move to deer area 235 (9-day season) the second weekend, and finish up in 184 (16-day season) on the last weekend.
      • Late southeast (B) licenses are valid in the late southeast (B) area (300 Series) and season (November 21 - 29).
      • The hunter’s season choice (A or B) is printed on the license.
      • Both statewide (A) and late southeast (B) season licenses are valid during all firearms seasons in the metro deer management zone (701) and the 600-series permit areas.
      • A regular firearms license is valid for either an antlered buck or antlerless deer in any either-sex, two-deer limit, three-deer limit, or five-deer limit area or in a antlerless permit lottery area if successful in the lottery. If unsuccessful in the lottery, the firearms license is only valid for an antlered buck in antlerless permit lottery areas.
      • The youth firearm license may be used in the youth deer season, the statewide (A), and late southeast (B) seasons.

      Rifle/shotgun boundary

      In the shotgun zone (see the 2021 Deer Season Area Map), deer hunters may use only legal shotguns loaded with single-slug shotgun shells, legal muzzleloading long guns, or legal handguns.

      Lead in venison

      Hunters are encouraged to consider non-lead big game ammunition featuring expanding copper, brass, and gilding metal bullets. Dozens of such bullets have been perfected in recent years. They expand reliably and instantly, retain nearly all their weight, and penetrate better than most lead-core bullets. They are available as muzzleloader bullets and shotshell slugs, too.

      Hunters who try non-lead bullets usually find they perform as well as or better than lead-core bullets because there are no jackets to separate from the core and no soft lead to erode or break apart, hindering penetration. Prices for monolithic, non-lead bullets are comparable to those of premium lead-core ammo.

      Lead is a toxic metal harmful to anyone who ingests it, but especially to children and pregnant women. It can also cause cognitive issues for older adults. Lead core bullets can fragment into dozens of pieces and penetrate as far as 18 inches from the wound channel. In several studies, up to 30% of X-rayed, commercially butchered venison burger contained lead fragments.

      Non-lead bullets and slugs also eliminate secondary poisoning of bald eagles and other raptors that ingest lead fragments when feeding on gut piles. For more details, visit mndnr.gov/lead.

      Muzzleloader

      Regular muzzleloader license: any hunter can buy a muzzleloader license, including people who have purchased a firearm license.

      • The license is valid for an antlered buck or an antlerless deer in any either-sex, two-deer limit, three-deer limit, or five-deer limit permit area. In antlerless permit lottery areas, you must apply and receive an antlerless permit to take an antlerless deer. If unsuccessful in the lottery, the firearms license is only valid for an antlered buck in antlerless permit lottery areas.
      • The antlerless permit application deadline is Thursday, September 9.
      • Bonus permits may be used to take antlerless deer in two-deer limit, three-deer limit, or five-deer limit permit areas. Low-cost disease management permits may be used in place of bonus permits in the 600-series permit areas.
      • A youth muzzleloader license is required for the muzzleloader season.

      Open areas: Muzzleloader hunters may hunt statewide except:

      • Sherburne (DPA 224), Rice Lake and Rydell National Wildlife Refuges.
      • Areas closed to firearms hunting are also closed to muzzleloader hunting.

      Muzzleloader regulations

      • Any hunter may use magnifying or holographic “red dot” scopes during the muzzleloader deer season without a special permit.

        Possessing other firearms

        Muzzleloading firearms lawful for the taking of deer may be possessed only by persons with a valid license to take deer by muzzleloader. While muzzleloader hunting, a person may not possess a firearm other than the following: an unloaded firearm in a case or closed trunk of a motor vehicle, a shotgun and shells containing No. 4 buckshot or smaller, a handgun or rifle capable of firing only rimfire cartridges of .17 or .22 caliber, including .22 magnum or handguns by persons authorized under the Minnesota Personal Protection Act.

        Late CWD Hunts

        Valid license: Any unused archery, firearms, muzzleloader, or landowner license may be used. Weapons used must match the parent license. Only during this hunt, low-cost disease management permits may be purchased without first purchasing a parent license. Unfilled bonus permits or early antlerless permits may also be used. Hunters may participate in both of the hunts.

        Bag limit: The bag limit is unlimited for both antlerless deer and antlered bucks. The statewide bag limits for antlerless deer and antlered bucks do not apply during these hunts. During these hunts only, disease management permits are valid for taking both antlered bucks and antlerless deer. Only antlerless deer may be tagged with bonus permits or early antlerless tags.

        CWD sampling: CWD sampling is mandatory for any deer harvested during these hunts. Deer must be presented or provided for sampling at a sampling station no later than 24 hours after the hunt ends. Refer to the DNR web page for sampling station locations.

        Carcass movement restrictions apply.

        Public land access: In addition to Wildlife Management Areas, some State Parks, Scientific and Natural Areas, and other public lands will be open to hunting. Those with limited permits will be available on a first-come, first serve basis from license vendors beginning December 3. Permits will be available until the limit for the hunt is reached or until the Tuesday before the hunts begins (December 14 or 28), whichever occurs first. There is a limit of one of these special permits per hunter. The permit is required in addition to a hunting license and is no cost. A state park pass is required for vehicles.

        State Lands

        Aquatic Management Areas

        The DNR Fish and Wildlife Division acquires land along lakes and streams to provide fishing opportunities and to protect critical fish habitat. These areas, known as Aquatic Management Areas (AMAs), are posted with signs to indicate allowable uses. It is always unlawful to leave personal equipment, such as tree stands, unattended on AMAs.

        Wildlife Management Areas

        Find a list of the newest wildlife management areas (WMAs) and additions to existing wildlife management areas on the DNR’s WMA web page at: mndnr.gov/wmas, then select “New WMAs.” All public land in state-owned wildlife management areas is open to the hunting of all species of protected wild animals and trapping of mammals during the established seasons found in this booklet, except as follows:

        General restrictions

        • Trespass: Portions of WMAs posted closed to trespassing may not be entered without DNR authorization.
        • Closed hours: WMAs may not be entered or used during closed hours if posted with these restrictions at major access points, except by permit.
        • Camping: Camping is prohibited except in designated overnight-use areas or with a permit from the wildlife manager. A vehicle, trailer or tent lawfully left overnight must be occupied or attended.
        • Alcohol: Alcoholic beverages may not be consumed, except by persons lawfully occupying an overnight-use area.
        • Firearms and target shooting: Target, skeet, trap, or indiscriminate shooting is prohibited. A person may not possess an uncased or loaded firearm or an uncased or strung bow, except when lawfully taking a wild animal or by permit.
        • Destruction or removal of property: Signs, posts, fences, gates, buildings,
          trees, shrubs, vines, plants, or other property may not be destroyed or removed (including use of metal detectors to remove property), except as follows: Wetland vegetation may be used to build blinds on the area, and edible fruits and seeds, or decorative portions of plants may be removed for personal use. Shed antlers may be collected for personal use.
        • Garbage disposal and animal abandonment: Disposing of or abandoning live animals, carcasses, garbage, trash, spoil, sludge, rocks, vehicles, or other debris or personal property on any WMA is prohibited.
        • Hunting, fishing and trapping equipment: Boats, decoys, game cameras and other equipment must not be left unattended overnight, with the exception of traps in areas open to trapping and fish houses or dark houses in certain designated WMAs.
        • Blinds and structures: A person may not construct or maintain any building, dock, fence, billboard, sign, or other structure on any WMA, except that temporary waterfowl blinds may be erected, but may not become private property or be used to preempt hunting rights. Any materials brought into a WMA for the construction of a blind must be removed each day at the close of hunting hours.
        • Elevated stands: A person may not construct, occupy, or use any elevated scaffold or other elevated device for the purpose of hunting, watching, or killing wild animals, except that portable stands may be used if they are removed each day
          at the close of hunting hours and do no permanent damage. Prior to the opening day of archery deer season, portable stands may be left overnight in a wildlife management area by a person with a valid bear license who is hunting within 100 yards of a bear bait site that is legally tagged and registered. The licensee’s name and address, or drivers license number, or MNDNR number must be affixed to the stand in such a manner that it can be read from the ground.
        • Dogs: Dogs are permitted on WMAs only when accompanied by or under
          the control of the owner. From April 16 through July 14, dogs must be on a leash. A person training a dog on a WMA may not use live ammunition or blank cartridges, including the use of blanks in dummy launchers or similar devices.
        • Other domestic animals: Livestock, horses, and other domestic animals, are not permitted on WMAs except under cooperative agreement or permit approved by the wildlife manager.
        • Unprotected animals: Unprotected wild animals may be taken from September 1 through the last day of February, or by any person legally hunting a protected species, unless the area is specifically closed.
        • Beaver and otter: Beavers and otters may only be taken by permit issued by the wildlife manager.
        • Crows: Crows may be taken during established seasons, unless the area is specifically closed.

        WMAs with special restrictions

        Becklin Homestead Park WMA (Isanti County)—Is only open to accessible hunts.

        Bass Brook WMA (Itasca County) St. Michael Meadow WMA (Wright County)—Closed to hunting and trapping but open to archery deer hunting.

        Bayport WMA (Washington County), Hastings WMA (Dakota County), and Raguet WMA (Scott and Carver counties)—Closed to trapping unprotected mammals except during trapping seasons for protected species. Firearms must be unloaded and cased, except in designated hunting areas during the small game season when shotguns with No. 4 or smaller shot only are permitted. Archery equipment is limited to designated hunting areas during established seasons on the Bayport WMA.

        Vermillion River AMA/WMA, Gores Pool #3 WMA (Dakota County)—Portions are posted archery only for deer. On the same portions, all other game restricted to shotguns with BBB shot or smaller.

        Chub Lake WMA (Dakota County)—Portions are posted archery only.

        Boerner WMA (Sibley County), Buelow WMA (Steele County), Bryson WMA (Freeborn County), Chapa Kak-Say-Za WMA (Steele County), and Hutchinson WMA (McLeod County)—These areas are closed to the hunting and trapping of all species.

        Carl and Verna Schmidt WMA (LeSueur County) Bur Oak WMA (LeSueur County) Hearding Island WMA and Interstate Island WMA (St. Louis County) and Pine City WMA (Pine County)—Closed to hunting of all species.

        Carlos Avery WMA Controlled Hunt Zone—Two waterfowl hunting areas are available by drawing on Saturday and Tuesday mornings until the firearms deer opener. For details go to: mndnr.gov/averyhunt, or call Carlos Avery WMA Headquarters at 651-539-3323.

        Gold Portage WMA (Koochiching and St. Louis counties)—This area is open only to waterfowl hunting.

        Gun Lake WMA (Aitkin County)—A 20-acre posted wildlife sanctuary is closed to trespass from September 1 through March 31.

        Pelican Lake WMA (Wright County)—A 102-acre posted wildlife sanctuary is closed to trespass from March 1 through November 30.

        Four Corners WMA (Martin County)—The portion of Four Corners WMA located South of County Road 32 (140th Street), east of State Highway 4 and north of North Shore Drive posted as Wildlife Sanctuary is closed to access, hunting or trapping during duck season from opening day through final day.

        Hampton Woods WMA (Dakota County)—Open for archery deer hunting and spring and fall turkey hunting. Small game may be taken through Nov. 30. Trapping and predator hunting by special permit only. Only shotguns with fine shot (BBB or smaller diameter) may be used. Some areas are posted “No Hunting.” Contact the Vermillion Complex Wildlife Office for more information (651) 322-4643.

        Haverhill WMA (Olmstead County)—Has buffer areas closed to the discharge of firearms and hunting along the southern boundary and south of the west parking lot. Closed to waterfowl hunting.

        Uppgaard WMA (Crow Wing County)—This area is open to hunting beginning on the opening day of waterfowl hunting.

        Gordon W. Yeager WMA (in the Rochester Refuge, Olmsted County) Eastside WMA (Olmsted County), and Clare Johnson–Carl Schmidt WMA (Morrison County)—These areas are closed to waterfowl hunting. Except on the Eastside WMA, firearms are restricted to shotgun with fine shot (No. 4 or smaller) only for small game hunting.

        Gordon W. Yeager WMA—Closed to the discharge of firearms west of County Road 22 (East Circle Drive) by posting.

        Lac qui Parle, Thief Lake, Talcot Lake, and Orwell WMAs—Small game hunting (including fall turkey) is restricted in the Controlled Goose Hunting Zones.

        Lake Blanche WMA (Ottertail County)—This area is closed to firearms deer hunting. Mentel WMA (Mower County)—Closed to all firearms hunting, but it is open for trapping and archery hunting.

        Moose Willow WMA (Aitkin County)—The south portion of the Moose Pool has been posted as a wildlife sanctuary, closed to access, hunting or trapping from September 1 - March 31.

        Talcot Lake WMA—Small and big game hunting is restricted in the controlled hunting zone.

        Ricehaven WMA (St. Louis County)—The posted sanctuary is closed to all trespass from September 15 through November 24. Canoeing, birdwatching, and wild rice harvest (during the wild rice season) is allowed from May 1 through September 14. Hunting and trapping for any species for which there is an open season is allowed from November 25 through April 30 in the posted area.

        Sand Prairie WMA (Sherburne County)—Open during the regular archery season for youth ages 10 through 17.

        Sandstone WMA (Pine County)—Open to archery hunting for deer (no firearms deer hunting). Archery bear hunting by special permit only. Call General Andrews Field Office (218) 423-6026 for permit. Open to hunting and trapping of all other species by legal means during designated seasons.

        Timber Lake WMA (Jackson County)—The area east of 440th Avenue and South of State Highway 60 is closed to firearms deer hunting (as posted). Portions are closed to all hunting during the duck season from opening day through final day (as posted).

        Pike Bay WMA (St. Louis County)—This area is closed to trapping of all species. Schrafel WMA (Mower County)—This area is closed to trapping and firearms hunting. Open to falconry and archery hunting for deer and small game.

        Dr. Johan C. Hvoslef WMA (Fillmore County)—This area is open to archery hunting only from September 1 through October 31 and during the spring turkey season. Firearms hunting (no centerfire rifles) is allowed from November 1 through December 15.

        Wesley Olson WMA (Big Stone County)—A portion is closed to all trespass, but the remaining area is open to hunting.

        West Heron Lake WMA (Jackson County)—The area north of 860th Street posted as Wildlife Sanctuary is closed September 1 through the final day of duck season (as posted).

        Tom Cliff WMA (Waseca County), Somsen WMA (Brown County)—Closed to hunting. Perched Valley WMA (Goodhue County) and

        Yucatan WMA (Fillmore and Houston counties)—Has buffer areas posted closed to hunting.

        Roseau River WMA (Roseau County)—The Pool 1 Sanctuary is open for deer hunting during the muzzleloader season (including archery hunting).

        Vermillion Highlands—A Research, Recreation and Wildlife Management Area (Dakota County) is open to archery, firearms and muzzleloader deer hunting by special lottery only and is open to late season pheasant and goose hunting and spring turkey hunting. Pheasant and goose hunting is open from December 13, 2021 through the end of the respective seasons. Predator hunting is allowed from January 1 - March 15 by special permit only. Closed to small game and all other species not listed above. Contact the Vermillion Complex Wildlife Office for questions at 651-322-4643.

        Public hunting land maps

        Find exact boundaries of WMAs, WPAs, state forests, national forests, and national wildlife refuges using the Recreation Compass online
        at mndnr.gov/maps/compass

        Northwest Minnesota wildlife management area regulations

            TRESPASS LAW

              The trespass law applies to all outdoor recreation, including: hunting, boating, fishing, trapping, hiking, and camping. When taking part in outdoor recreation, you may not enter legally posted land or agricultural land without permission.

              Landowners, lessees, or authorized managers need only post their land once a year. The signs must be placed at intervals of 1,000 feet (500 feet in wooded areas) or signs may be placed at primary corners of each parcel and at access points to the property. Signs must state “No Trespassing,” or similar words, in 2-inch high letters and have either the signature or the name and telephone number of the landowner, lessee,
              or manager.

              There can be civil or criminal penalties for violation of the trespass laws with maximum fines up to $3,000 and license revocation. All conservation officers and peace officers enforce trespass laws. If you have doubts about whether you may be trespassing on private land, ask the landowner for permission.

              Restrictions

              • A person may not enter legally posted land for outdoor recreation purposes without permission.
              • A person may not enter agricultural land for outdoor recreation purposes without permission.
              • A person may not remain on or return within one year to any private land for outdoor recreation purposes after being told to leave by the owner, occupant or lessee.
              • On another person’s private land or a public right-of-way, a person may not discharge a firearm within 500 feet of a building occupied by humans or livestock without written permission of the owner, occupant or lessee of the building. This does not apply to people hunting on their own property.
              • A person may hunt from the water, a private shooting preserve, or from public land that is within 500 feet of a building occupied by humans or livestock.
              • A person may not discharge a firearm within 500 feet of a corral of one acre or less confining livestock for the purpose of normal livestock holding or sorting operations without permission. This does not apply to persons hunting during an established season on state or local government-owned land that is not road right-of-way.
              • A person may not take a wild animal on any land where the person is prohibited from lawfully entering by this law. This prohibition includes coyote hunters intentionally running their dogs on posted or agricultural land without permission of the landowner, occupant, or lessee.
              • A person may not wound or kill another person’s domestic animal, destroy private property, or pass through a closed gate without returning it to the original position.

              Exceptions

              • A person on foot may, without permission, enter land that is not posted to retrieve a wounded wild animal that was lawfully shot, but may not remain on the land after being told to leave.
              • A person on foot may, without permission, enter private land without a firearmto retrieve a hunting dog. After retrieving the dog, the person must immediately leave the premises. This exception does not authorize the taking of the wild animal.
              • A person on foot may, without permission, enter land that is posted with “Walk-In Access” signs.

              Permission is required on agricultural land even if it’s not posted

              Hunters and trappers must always respect private lands. Ask first before entering lands not posted as being open to hunting and trapping.

              Notification to stay off private land, authorization to remove a sign posted to prevent trespass, or legal permission to enter private land or to take wild animals near occupied buildings or corrals, may only be given by the owner, occupant, or lessee.

              What is agricultural land?

              “Agricultural land” is land that: 1) is plowed or tilled; 2) has standing crops or crop residues; 3) is within a maintained fence for enclosing domestic livestock (including horses); 4) is planted to native or introduced grassland or hay land; or 5) is planted to short-rotation woody crops (hybrid poplar and other woody plants that are harvested for their fiber within 15 years of planting).

              Posting is not required on lands considered agricultural, including:

              • All planted grassland and hay land.
              • All hybrid poplar and other woody plants harvested for fiber within 15 years of planting.
              • Riparian buffers required by law.
              • Land enrolled in Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) or Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM).
              • Land that is brush or trees should be posted. When the agricultural status of land is not clear, verbal notice should be given to trespassers before enforcement can occur.

              Water access and recreational use

              What is lawful access?

              A stream or lake is lawfully accessible if there is a public access, or if public land or a public road right-of-way abuts the surface of the water, or if you have permission to cross private land to reach the surface of the water.

              What is recreational use?

              Recreational use includes boating, swimming, fishing, hunting, trapping, and similar activities. It includes walking in the water in connection with such activities regardless of who owns the land beneath the surface of the water.

              What waters are open to recreational use?

              A stream or lake is open to recreational use over its entire surface if it is capable of recreational use and if it is lawfully accessible. Any water that will float a canoe is capable of recreational use, but other waters may also qualify depending upon the circumstances.

              Landowner liability

              An owner who gives written or oral permission for the use of the land for recreational purposes without charge does not, by that action:

              • extend any assurance that the land is safe for any purpose,
              • confer upon the person the legal status of an invitee or licensee to whom a duty of care is owed, or
              • assume responsibility for or incur liability for any injury to the person or property caused by an act or omission of the person.

              Road right-of-way

              Some road right-of-ways are not owned by a unit of government. In these instances the landowner has granted an easement for vehicle and foot travel. The landowner generally retains authority to restrict access for hunting or trapping and may prohibit trespass by posting the land or by verbally directing hunters and trappers to leave the easement. It’s always best to ask permission if in doubt about the ownership of a road ditch area. County or township offices also may be able to help determine the ownership status of a road ditch.

              Helpful examples of road right-of-way ownership and public use include:

              • Hunting is not allowed on Interstate Highway right-of-ways.
              • State highways are most often owned by the state, but there may be a mix of easements and state ownership.
              • County roads may be owned by the county, or there may be easements. Roadways with easements tend to be gravel, while roads owned by the county tend to be paved. Road surface is a visual indicator of the ownership but is not an absolute condition.
              • Township roads are generally easement and not owned by the township, but some township roads are owned by the township. As is the case with county roads, road surface can be a visual indicator of the ownership.
              • The ownership or easement status can vary on any one stretch of road, and can vary from road to road.

              Visually, the road right-of-way is improved and maintained, and you will normally notice a change in the property—including such things as ditches, fence lines, etc. The actual distance from the center of the road that is improved and maintained can vary under ownership or easement, and from one location to another.

              Federal aid in wildlife restoration

              Minnesota’s rich outdoor heritage is enjoyed by all. When you purchase a rifle, ammunition, archery equipment, and other sporting gear, you pay a federal excise tax and import duties. Since 1937, this money has been collected by the federal government and redistributed to the states using a formula based on hunting license sales and the state’s land area.

              These funds support projects, habitat management, wildlife management areas, technical guidance, population management, wildlife inventory and surveys, wildlife land acquisition, and hunter education, recruitment and retention.

              GENERAL HUNTING INFORMATION

              The following are general hunting regulations. Regulations for specific game species follow.

              Firearms, Bows and Crossbows

              How do I legally transport my firearm?

              A person may not transport a firearm, including a handgun, in or on a motor vehicle unless the firearm is:

              • unloaded and fastened in a case so that no part of the firearm is exposed (a holster is not a legal case);
              • unloaded and in the closed trunk of a motor vehicle; or
              • a pistol or handgun authorized under the Minnesota Personal Protection Act.

              Under the following circumstances, a person may transport unloaded, uncased firearms (excluding pistols) in a motor vehicle, including ATVs:

              • while at a shooting range with permission.
              • while lawfully hunting on private or public land or while travelling to or from a site the person intends to hunt or trap or has lawfully hunted that day.

              Firearms must be transported unloaded and cased:

              • within Anoka, Hennepin, or Ramsey counties.
              • within the boundaries of a home rule, charter, or statutory city with a population of 2,500 or more.
              • on school grounds.
              • as otherwise restricted in laws related to game refuges, shining, thermal imaging or night vision laws.

              What does unloaded mean?

              Unloaded means a firearm without ammunition in the barrels or magazine, if the magazine is in the firearm. A flintlock ignition is unloaded if it does not have priming powder in a pan. A percussion ignition muzzleloader is unloaded if it does not have a percussion cap on a nipple.

              How do I legally transport my bow?

              Archery bows and crossbows may be transported uncased in a motor vehicle but cannot be armed with a bolt or arrow.

              Can I shoot from my vehicle?

              No person may take a wild animal with a firearm or bow from a motor vehicle, except hunters with a disability permit.

              Can I hunt with a handgun?

              • Persons age 18 or older may carry a handgun to hunt or target shoot.
              • Persons under age 18 who meet firearms safety requirements may carry handguns for hunting under the supervision of a parent or guardian.
              • Unless authorized to carry a pistol or handgun under the Minnesota Personal Protection Act, a person may not possess a firearm while bow hunting for deer.
              • A person may take bear and elk by archery while in possession of a firearm.
              • Persons authorized to carry a handgun or pistol under the Minnesota Personal Protection Act may carry it uncased and loaded while hunting and while traveling to or from hunting locations by motor vehicle.

              Can I hunt with a crossbow?

              • Persons age 60 and over with a valid archery license may take deer or turkey with a crossbow during the respective regular archery seasons.
              • Persons hunting under a regular firearms license may take deer, bear or turkey with a crossbow during the respective firearms seasons. Any person may hunt during the fall wild turkey season with a crossbow.
              • Persons with a disability who have a valid permit and archery license may also hunt with crossbows or use a bow with a mechanical device that draws, releases, or holds the bow at full draw.
              • Otherwise, a person may not hunt with or possess a crossbow in a motor vehicle during any hunting season unless it is not armed with a bolt or arrow.

              If I’m not hunting deer, can I possess a firearm during the deer season?

              No person may possess a firearm or ammunition outdoors five days before the firearms deer opener and ending the second day after the close of the season where deer may be taken by firearms, except:

              • A person hunting big game with a valid firearms big game license in possession.
              • Possession is also legal under these conditions:
                • An unloaded firearm that is cased or in a closed trunk of a motor vehicle.
                • A shotgun and shells containing No. 4 buckshot or smaller.
                • A handgun or rifle with .22 caliber short, long, or long rifle, magnum or .17 caliber rimfire cartridges.
                • Handguns by a person with a permit to carry a weapon under the Minnesota Personal Protection Act.
                • On a target range or under a target range permit issued by a conservation officer.

              This does not apply to the muzzleloader season. Muzzleloaders that are legal for deer may be possessed afield only by persons with a muzzleloader or firearms deer license during that season.

              Protected and Unprotected Animals

              Protected animals

              Protected animals are all birds and mammals that may be taken as authorized during established hunting seasons.

              Crows

              • Crows may be taken without a license during the established hunting season or at any time when they are doing or are about to do damage.
              • Electronic calls or sounds may be used for crow hunting.
              • Crows may be taken with a legal firearm (shotgun not larger than 10 gauge, rifle, or handgun), bow and arrow, or by falconry.

              Mammals

              • All mammals for which hunting seasons are established in these regulations are protected mammals, but may be taken as authorized.
              • There is no open season on caribou, antelope, lynx, wolverine, cougar, wolf, moose or spotted skunk (“civet cat”).
              • A person may not export or import a live coyote into the state unless authorized by the Commissioner.

              Nongame bird species

              Most bird species, including bobwhite quail, swans, hawks, owls, eagles, herons, bitterns, cormorants, loons and grebes may not be taken. Only designated game birds during open hunting seasons and unprotected birds may be taken.

              Taking protected species

              All protected species must be killed before being removed from the site where taken.

              Unprotected animals

              • Unprotected birds include house sparrows, starlings, common pigeons, Eurasian collared dove, chukar partridge, quail, other than northern bobwhite, and monk parakeets. These birds may be taken at any time.
              • Unprotected mammals include: coyotes, plains pocket gophers, porcupines, red/pine squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), striped skunks, and woodchucks. Mammals for which there are no closed seasons or other protection are also unprotected. These animals may be taken at any time.
              • Unprotected birds and mammals may be taken in any manner, except with the aid of artificial lights or by using a motor vehicle to drive, chase, run over, or kill the animal.
              • Poisons may be used only when the safety of humans and animals is ensured and in accordance with state and federal restrictions.

              Do I need a license to hunt unprotected species?

              No. Residents and nonresidents are not required to have a license to hunt unprotected species including coyote. Nonresidents may trap only on land they own in Minnesota with nonresident trapping and small game licenses.

              What do “taking” and “possession” mean for hunters?

              “Taking” means pursuing, shooting, killing, capturing, trapping, snaring, angling, spearing, or netting wild animals; or placing, setting, drawing, or using a net, trap, or other device to take wild animals. Taking also includes attempting to take wild animals or assisting another person in taking wild animals.

              “Possession” means game animals are in a person’s possession whether on hand, in cold storage, in transport, or elsewhere.

              Accessible Hunting Options

              I have a disability. Can I get a permit to hunt from a vehicle?

              Yes. A person with a disability who has the appropriate permit may take a wild animal with a firearm or by archery from a motor vehicle.

              What does the permit allow?

              Except in bucks-only areas, a person with a disability with a permit to shoot from a stationary motor vehicle may take a deer of either sex without an antlerless permit. Other members of the hunting party may not shoot antlerless deer for this person.

              How do I get a permit?

              Permits to shoot from a stationary motor vehicle may be issued by DNR Enforcement to a person who has a permanent physical disability that is more substantial than discomfort from walking.

              Who qualifies for permits?

              The permit recipient must: be unable to step from a vehicle without aid of a wheelchair, crutches, braces, or other mechanical support or prosthetic device; or be unable to walk any distance because of a permanent lung, heart, or other internal disease that requires the person to use supplemental oxygen to assist breathing.

              Do I need to get my disability verified to get a permit?

              Yes. The permanent disability must be verified in writing by a licensed physician, certified nurse practitioner or certified physician’s assistant acting under the direction of a licensed physician or chiropractor. The applicant must possess a valid disability parking certificate or license plates issued by the Department of Public Safety.

              How do I apply?

              Permit applications are available online at mndnr.gov/licenses/special or from any DNR regional office.

              Are there other permits or exceptions for hunters with disabilities?

              Yes. People with permanent physical disabilities may obtain a firearms hunting license with a provisional firearms safety certificate. While hunting, they must be accompanied and assisted by a parent, guardian or other adult.

              All-terrain Vehicles for Hunting

              What is considered an all-terrain vehicle?For the purposes of these regulations, all vehicles not requiring Minnesota Department of Public Safety licensing, including motorized trail bikes, 3-wheelers, 4-wheelers, 6-wheelers, tracked vehicles, and other similarly manufactured or home-made vehicles.A person may not intentionally operate:
              • in most wildlife management areas, a state park, or a scientific and natural area,except as authorized in this booklet;

              • in unfrozen public waters (lakes, rivers, streams and certain wetlands), or in calcareous fens;
              • on a trail on public land that is designated or signed for non-motorized use only;
              • on areas within public lands that are posted or where gates or other clearly visible structures are placed to prevent unauthorized motorized vehicle access; or to shoot at a wild animal from an all-terrain vehicle.

              Are there special restrictions during deer season?

              To reduce disturbance during the prime deer hunting times, operation of all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles is restricted during the regular firearms deer season:

              Licensed deer hunters

              Licensed deer hunters must not operate an all-terrain vehicle or snowmobile on public or private property in an area where their license is valid except:

              • Before legal shooting hours (1⁄2 hour before sunrise).
              • From 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.
              • After legal shooting hours (1⁄2 hour after sunset).
              • On property they own.
              • On private property with the landowner’s permission.
              • Under a permit issued by a conservation officer in an emergency or other unusual situation.
              • For details on exceptions in the northwest, see the 2021 Deer Season Area Map insert and online mndnr.gov/hunting/deer/map.

              Motor vehicles licensed for and being operated on public highways, or farm tractors being used for agricultural purposes, are exempt from this restriction.

              Recreational riders

              During the Statewide (A) Firearms Deer Season, trails and routes on state forest lands are closed to all recreational riding (all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles) where deer may be taken by rifle.Forest roads remain open to all-terrain vehicle use.

              Operation in parks, refuges, and other managed areas

              All-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles are not allowed in state parks, national wildlife refuges, scientific and natural areas, or most wildlife management areas. All-terrain vehicle use is regulated in state and national forests.

              Dogs

              When can I train my dog on public land?

              Dogs may not be trained on DNR administered lands from April 16 to July 14. At other times a person training a dog afield and carrying a firearm may only have blank cartridges and shells in possession when the season is not open for any game bird, except by permit.

              Dogs pursuing big game

              No persons may allow their dog to chase or kill big game.

              Between January 1 and July 14, a dog that is observed wounding, killing, or pursuing in a way that endangers big game may be killed by any person. A peace officer or conservation officer may kill a dog that endangers big game at any time of the year. The officer or person is not liable for damages for killing the dog.

              Be aware of other hunters

              Other hunting seasons are open before, during, and after the deer season. Many hunters use dogs to hunt upland game, waterfowl, rabbits, raccoons, foxes, and coyotes. Dogs may not be shot if seen pursuing big game during the fall hunting seasons, except by a conservation or peace officer.

              Dogs running game during closed seasons

              • Rabbits, hares and foxes may be run by use of dogs during the closed season without being taken, except from April 16 - July 14.
              • Raccoons may be run by the use of dogs during the closed season, without being taken, and without a license.

              Dogs retrieving wounded deer and bear

              A person may use a dog to locate and retrieve a wounded deer or bear as follows:

              • The person attempting to locate the animal must have in possession a valid license to take the deer or bear.
              • Dog handlers who do not have a valid hunting license must be accompanied by a licensed hunter with the license in possession.
              • The licensed hunter and dog handler must be on foot and must wear blaze orange/pink.
              • Any light used must be an artificial light carried in the hand or attached to the person.
              • The dog must be on a leash no longer than 30 feet. The hunter or dog handler must physically control the leash at all times.
              • The dog owner’s name and telephone number must be on the dog while it is used to locate a wounded deer or bear.

              Preventing and handling accidental trap catches

              Knowledge of traps can help dog owners feel more comfortable when their
              dogs are in the field. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has developed excellent information to help dog owners identify traps placed in a natural setting and release dogs that are accidentally caught in traps. Dog owners can find this information online at: http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/p...

              In addition, the Minnesota DNR has kits and information that will be available for groups who want to handle traps and learn more about how to release dogs from traps.

              Using Lights, Night Vision, Drones, or Wireless Devices

              Can I legally use lights to look at deer?

              A person may not cast artificial light (for example onto a highway or into a field, or forest, etc.) to locate or take a wild animal while possessing either individually or as one of a group, a firearm, bow or other implement that could be used to take big game, small game or unprotected species.

              Shining lights generally

              Shining is allowed for two hours after sunset without a firearm, bow or other implement to take wild animals. From two hours after sunset until sunrise, no person may cast artificial light on a highway or into a field or forest to locate a wild animal.

              A person may not cast artificial light on land that is marked with signs prohibiting the shining of lights. The signs must:

              • display letters that are at least 2 inches in height and state “no shining” or similar terms.
              • be placed at intervals of 500 feet or less along the boundary of an area.

              A person may not cast an artificial light onto fenced agricultural land or a residential property or building sites from a motor vehicle.

              Exceptions:

              • Without a firearm or a bow, a person who is on foot may use a handheld artificial light to retrieve wounded or dead big game animals.
              • A person taking raccoons or tending traps in accordance with all other regulations in this booklet.

              It is not a violation of this law to use laser range finders or shine lights without a firearm while doing any activity not related to spotting, locating or taking a wild animal. It is also not a violation to use an electronic range finder from 1⁄2 hour before sunrise until 1⁄2 hour after sunset while lawfully hunting wild animals.

              Lights for hunting fox and coyote (January 1 - March 15)

              A person hunting for coyote or fox from January 1 - March 15 may use an artificial light (either carried in the hand or attached to the person) under all of the following conditions:

              • While on foot and not within a public right of way • Using a shotgun
              • Using a calling device
              • Not within 200 feet of a vehicle

              Night vision equipment

              A person may not possess any kind of night vision or thermal imaging equipment while taking wild animals or while possessing a firearm, bow, or other implement that could be used to take wild animals.

              This regulation does not apply when:

              • NEW—A person legally taking coyote or fox is using night vision or thermal imaging equipment, including the use of infrared illuminators to enhance night vision equipment. This exception does not apply when hunting other species or during the regular firearms deer season. There are additional firearms restrictions during the deer season.
              • A firearm is unloaded, cased, and in the closed trunk of a motor vehicle; or a bow is cased or unstrung, and in the closed trunk of a motor vehicle.
              • If the vehicle does not have a trunk, the firearm or bow must be placed in the rearmost location of the vehicle.

              Can I use a drone when hunting?

              Drones cannot be used to take big game or small game. It is also illegal to harass hunters, trappers or anglers with a drone. No person may use aircraft over a WMA in a manner that chases, herds, scares, or otherwise disturbs wildlife, except in emergencies or by authorization of the wildlife manager. Drones may not be flown over wildlife management areas.

              Can I use wireless devices to take game?• No. Using walkie talkies, cell phones, remote control or other radio equipment, including drones, to take big game or small game is unlawful.

              • A person may use radio equipment without a permit to take unprotected wild animals.
              • Dog training collars are allowed.
              • Motorized decoys controlled by remote may be used for taking migratory waterfowl or mourning doves where allowed.
              • A remote controlled animal noise caller can be used for crows, furbearing animals and unprotected animals.
              • Unattended electronic devices may not be used for taking wild animals.

              Storage, Possession and Sale of Wild Animals

              Can someone store my game or pelts for me?

              Yes, but the package must be plainly marked, in ink, with your name and address, your license number, and the number and species in the package.

              What parts of animals may legally be bought or sold?

              A person may possess, transport, buy, or sell these parts of lawfully taken game animals except for migratory game birds, which cannot be bought or sold: bones (including skulls), hooves, antlers, sinews, teeth, hides, claws. In addition, the flesh

              of lawfully taken beaver, muskrat, raccoon, rabbits, and hares may be bought, sold, and transported at any time. Skulls of game animals, including deer skulls with antlers attached may not be possessed without a permit unless they were lawfully taken.

              A person may not sell bear meat or organs, including bear gall bladders, and may not sell bear paws unless attached to the hide.

              Who can legally buy and sell pelts?

              A hunter or trapper may sell the pelts of lawfully taken furbearers only to a licensed fur buyer. A person may not buy raw furs without a fur buyer’s license, except a fur manufacturer or licensed taxidermist may buy raw furs from a licensed fur buyer.

              Game for consumption at fund raising events

              Nonprofit organizations may charge a fee for admission to fundraising events when lawfully taken and possessed big game and small game (excluding migratory game birds that cannot be sold under federal law), is donated to the organization and is served for consumption on the premises where the fundraising event is held. Records of donations must be kept for 2 years.

              Wanton waste

              A person may not wantonly waste or destroy a usable part of a protected wild animal.

              Can I give game I harvest as a gift?

              Yes, but a receipt containing: name and address of the owner; name and address of the recipient, date of transfer, description of the gift (for example: “Three, 1-pound venison steaks”) and the license number must remain with the gift.

              I found a car-killed animal. Can I keep it?

              Yes, but you must have a permit to possess protected wild animals, including deer, that have been killed by a vehicle. Permits are available from conservation officers and many local law enforcement agencies.

              Hunting Outside Seasons, Controlled Substances, and Accidents

              Is anyone allowed to hunt outside of state established deer seasons?

              Indian bands may be hunting big game by firearms before and after state firearms seasons.

              Members of the Fond du Lac band may hunt big game from late September through December in the 1854 ceded territory (Cook, Lake, eastern and southern St. Louis, most of Carlton, and extreme northern Pine counties).

              Members of bands signatory to the 1837 Treaty (east-central Minnesota from Pine and Chisago counties west to the Mississippi River) may hunt deer after Labor Day through December.

              Hunting while under the influence

              You may not hunt or be afield with a loaded or uncased firearm or an uncased bow while under the influence of a controlled substance or with a blood-alcohol level of .08 or higher.

              Hunter/trapper harassment prohibited

              A person may not prevent or disrupt another person from taking or preparing to take a wild animal. A person may not disturb wild animals with the intent to prevent or disrupt another person from hunting.

              What should I do if there’s an accidental shooting?

              A person who shoots and injures another person with a firearm, or believes that another person might be injured, and any witnesses to a shooting, must immediately investigate the extent of the person’s injuries and give reasonable assistance, including calling law enforcement or medical personnel to the scene.

              Enforcement

              A person must allow inspection in the field of firearms, licenses, wild animals, motor vehicles, boats, or other conveyances used while taking or transporting wild animals.

              Wild animals that are unlawfully taken, bought, sold or possessed may be seized and confiscated. The person may be liable for wildlife restitution in addition to criminal fines. Personal property such as firearms, traps and archery equipment that were unlawfully used may be seized and confiscated.

              Blaze Clothing Requirements

              Hunter safety is a top priority. Blaze clothing has been found to be one factor that has helped make hunting one of the safest sports/activities.

              • All hunters and trappers in the field during the open firearms/muzzleloader deer seasons must display blaze orange or pink on the visible portion of the person’s cap and outer clothing above the waist, excluding sleeves and gloves.
              • When no firearms/muzzleloader deer season is open, a person may not take small game unless the visible portion of at least one article of clothing above the waist is blaze orange or pink. See exceptions noted below.
              • Blaze orange or pink camouflage patterns are allowed and must be at least 50 percent blaze orange or pink within each square foot.

              Exceptions: blaze clothing is not required during a firearms/muzzleloader deer season when:

              • Hunting an area open only to archery hunting (no firearms hunting allowed)
              • Hunting migratory waterfowl while on the water or in a stationary location
              • Trapping while on the water

              Exceptions: blaze clothing is not required when no firearms/muzzleloader deer season is open if:

              • Taking small game while archery deer hunting in a stationary location
              • Hunting turkey
              • Hunting migratory birds
              • Hunting raccoons and predators (coyote, fox, bobcat)
              • Trapping furbearers
              • Hunting small game by falconry
              • Hunting bear