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Colorado

Hunting

Waterfowl Regulations

GENERAL INFORMATION

HARVEST INFORMATION PROGRAM (HIP)

Small-game, furbearer and migratory bird hunters, including falconers, must sign up with HIP EACH YEAR before their license is valid. You can get a 2021– 2022 HIP number beginning on April 1 but can get a HIP number anytime after April 1, as long as it's before you hunt small game during the 2021–2022 season. Write the new HIP number on your license!

To sign up with HIP, call 1-866-265-6447 (1-866-COLOHIP) from 7 a.m.–10:30 p.m., or go to colohip.com. You will be asked for basic informa- tion, including how many birds and small game you harvested the previous season, and the species you plan to hunt this year. A season means Sept. 1 through March 15 of the next year. This information helps CPW manage mi- gratory bird and resident small-game species by improving harvest estimates.

NEW Live operator phone registrations at 1-866-COLO-HIP are no longer offered during the overnight hours from 10:30 p.m. to 7 a.m. The live operator system is also closed all day on major holidays (Thanksgiv- ing, Christmas and New Year's Day). During these out-of-service periods, please call back during open service times or go to colohip.com and register online, still available 24/7.

WALK-IN ACCESS PROGRAM (WIA)

The Walk-In Access (WIA) program provides opportunities to hunt small game, migratory game birds and furbearers on enrolled properties, only dur- ing established season dates. Properties are closed to hunting Gambel’s quail and greater sage-grouse.

The regular season walk-in properties are open Sept. 1 through the end of Feb. The late cropland season properties are open from the opening day of pheasant season through the end of Feb. Extended walk-in properties are open from the start of pheasant season through the end of March.

Properties are open to foot access only, from one hour before sunrise until one hour after sunset. They are open two hours before sunrise until two hours after sunset for waterfowl, deer, elk or pronghorn hunting.

Hunters must have a small-game license and Habitat Stamp to hunt on WIA lands. Properties enrolled are posted with Walk-In Access signs and published in the WIA atlas. Access is prohibited as posted when the land- owner is actively harvesting crops.

Two atlases for 2021–22 will be published. The early version, the 2021 REGULAR WALK-IN ATLAS, is available in late Aug. and includes properties open Sept. 1. The 2021 LATE CROPLAND ATLAS will be available in late Oct. and includes an updated property list.

NOTE: Some WIA properties in eastern Colorado will be open for both small-game and big-game hunting as part of the Big Game Access Program. See the 2021 REGULAR WALK-IN ATLAS for more details.

SMALL-GAME SURVEYS

Colorado Parks and Wildlife conducts several small-game harvest surveys annually to estimate harvest, hunter numbers and recreation days, in addition to assessing satisfaction and crowding. Past surveys are available on the CPW website at cpw.state.co.us/small-game-stats, and updated reports are available after annual surveys conclude.

Hunters are selected randomly to participate. Small-game surveys are by telephone or by email. If contacted, your participation is not required, but responding — even if you did not hunt or harvest an animal — helps CPW manage small game.

DONATING WILDLIFE

You can donate edible parts of wildlife to a like-license holder anywhere or to anyone at the recipient’s home. A like-license is for the same species, sex, dates and manner of take as the donor’s license. Bag and possession limits apply to donors and recipients and birds must be properly tagged. See "Tagging, Transporting Birds."

WILDLIFE CAUSING DAMAGE

Colorado law allows landowners to protect private property from most wild- life damage. For information, call CPW at 303-297-1192. Also see cpw.state. co.us/regulations, Chapter W-17: Game Damage, for updated trapping regulations and details on small-game damage.

CALL BEFORE DIGGING: 1-800-922-1987

Colorado law requires waterfowl hunters to call the Utility Notification Center of Colorado before digging hunting pits. By doing so, hunters can avoid ac- cidentally hitting electric, gas, water and other utility lines.

SAFE HANDLING OF GAME MEAT

Concern has grown about diseases affecting wild animals that could potential- ly make humans sick. Most of the time, properly handled and prepared game meat poses no greater risk than domestic meat of causing disease in humans. Hunters are encouraged to contact their local public health department or CPW office for information on wildlife diseases that may be present where they plan to hunt.

Public health officials recommend the following precautions when handling and preparing game meat:

  1. Do not handle animals that are obviously sick or found dead. Report sick or dead animals you find to a CPW office.
  2. Keep game cool, clean and dry.
  3. Do not eat, drink or smoke while dressing game.
  4. Use disposable gloves when cleaning game.
  5. Wash your hands with soap and water, or use alcohol wipes after dressing game.
  6. Clean all tools and surfaces immediately afterward. Use hot, soapy water, then disinfect with a 10 percent chlorine bleach solution.
  7. Cook game meat to an internal temperature of at least 165 degrees F to kill disease organisms and parasites. Juices from adequately cooked game meat should be clear.
  8. Do not eat any raw portions of wild game.
  9. Do not feed raw wild game to domestic pets.

GENERAL HUNTING LAWS

  1. Colorado Parks and Wildlife can post firing lines at its properties.
  2. It is illegal to kill, capture, injure or harass wildlife from a motor vehicle or an aircraft. It is also illegal to operate aircraft with intent to injure, harass, drive or rally wildlife. It is illegal to discharge a firearm or release an arrow from a motor vehicle or an aircraft.
  3. It is illegal to discharge a firearm or release an arrow from, on or across a public road. Hunting with rifles, handguns, shotguns firing a single slug and archery equipment is prohibited within 50 feet on each side of the center line of any public road. On a divided road, the prohibition includes the median, and the 50-foot requirement is measured from the center line of both roads.
  4. It is illegal to carry or have a firearm, except a pistol or revolver, in or on a motor vehicle unless the chamber is unloaded. While using artificial light from a vehicle, it is illegal to have a firearm with cartridges in the chamber or magazine, or possess a strung bow unless the bow is cased.
  5. You must take edible parts of game meat home to eat or provide it for human consump- tion. Do not leave wounded wildlife (or wildlife that might be wounded) without attempt- ing to track and kill it.
  6. Possession of wildlife is evidence you hunted.
  7. Small-game and migratory bird hunters are not required to wear solid, fluorescent orange or pink clothes. However, CPW encourages you to wear fluorescent orange or pink clothes for safety.
  8. You must stop at CPW check stations when told to do so.
  9. Violations of Colorado wildlife laws carry point values. You can face suspension of license privileges for up to five years or more if you accumulate 20 or more points in five years.
  10. During deer, elk, pronghorn and bear seasons, firearms (except handguns) must be unloaded in the chamber and magazine when carried on an off-highway vehicle (OHV). Firearms (except handguns) and bows carried on an OHV must be fully enclosed in a hard or soft case. Scabbards or cases with open ends or sides are prohibited. This regulation does not apply to landowners or their agents carrying a firearm on an OHV for the purpose of taking depredating wildlife on property owned or leased by them.
  11. CALIBER RESTRICTION: It is illegal to hunt game birds, small-game animals or furbearers with a centerfire rifle larger than .23 caliber in regular rifle deer and elk seasons west of I-25, unless you have an unfilled deer or elk license for the season you are hunting. A small-game license is required.

LEGAL HUNTING HOURS

Legal times to hunt small game and/or waterfowl are one- half hour before sunrise to sunset.

An exception is made for furbearers, which can be hunted from one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. Raccoons, coyotes, bobcats, striped skunks, beavers and red, gray or swift foxes can be hunted at night. See Furbearers under Small-Game Hunting Laws on page 5 for details.

In light goose conservation season, hunting is allowed one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset.

Go to cpw.state.co.us/huntingresources for a link to sunrise/sunset tables and more information.

RESTRICTIONS

CHILD SUPPORT DELINQUENCY

State law requires a Social Security number to buy a license. It is not displayed on the license but is provided, if requested, to Child Support Enforcement authori- ties. Hunting and fishing licenses are not issued to those suspended for noncompliance with child support. Any current licenses become invalid if held by an individual who is noncompliant with child support.

WEAPONS RESTRICTIONS

Colorado and federal laws prohibit people convicted of certain crimes, such as domestic violence, from possessing weapons even for hunting. If you’ve been convicted of a crime, check with the appropriate law enforcement author- ity to find out how the laws apply to you.

AIDS IN HUNTING SM. GAME & WATERFOWL

  1. Dogs are allowed to hunt small game, waterfowl and furbearers, but only to pursue, bring to bay, retrieve, flush or point. It is illegal to use dogs to hunt cottontail rabbits, snowshoe hares and tree squirrels on land where any regular deer, elk, pronghorn or moose season is in progress.
  2. Artificial decoys are permitted.
  3. European ferrets are permitted for hawking. Ferrets must be neutered, tattooed on left inguinal area and dyed along one-fourth of their body for easy field identification.
  4. Mechanical devices designed to call wildlife are allowed. Recorded or electronically amplified calls can be used to hunt furbearers and crows only.
  5. You can hunt migratory game birds over standing crops or feed used in the course of agricultural planting, har- vesting or other normal agricultural practices; baiting is not allowed.
  6. It is illegal to use drones to look for, scout or detect wild- life as an aid in hunting.

SMALL-GAME HUNTING LAWS

HUNTING TERMS & DEFINITIONS: SMALL GAME

AIR GUN: any rifle or handgun .177 caliber
or larger firing pellets, slugs or roundball ammunition powered by high-pressure air or compressed inert gas. Includes: pellet guns and pneumatic weapons.

CANADA LYNX RECOVERY AREA: in the San Juan and Rio Grande national forests, and associ- ated land above 9,000 feet, W from a N-S line through Del Norte; E from a N-S line through Dolores; from New Mexico N to Gunnison basin, including Taylor Park E to Collegiate Range. The recovery area includes GMUs 55, 65–68, 70, 71, 74–81, 551, 681, 711 and 751.

CROSSBOW: bow fired from the shoulder, attached perpendicularly to its stock. Has mechanical device to hold string cocked.

DAILY BAG LIMIT: maximum number of wildlife you can take in a day, including any eaten or donated during the day they're taken.

FALCONRY (OR HAWKING): hunting with a trained raptor.

FURBEARERS: mink; pine marten; badger; red, gray, swift fox; striped, western-spotted skunk; beaver; muskrat; long-tailed, short-tailed weasel; coyote; bobcat; opossum; ring-tailed cat; raccoon.

HAND-HELD BOW: long bow or compound bow with a manually held or drawn string.

HANDGUN: pistol, revolver, without shoulder stock or attachment.

LIVE TRAP (CAGE OR BOX): mechanical device designed so an animal enters the trap through a door that closes, preventing exiting.

PRE-CHARGED PNEUMATIC AIR GUN: air gun that is charged from an external high-compression source, such as an air compressor, air tank or external hand pump.

PELT: skin of a furbearer with hair intact.

POSSESSION LIMIT: maximum number of wild- life you can have at any time, including in the field, in transport, at home or in storage.

RIFLE: firearm fired from the shoulder with a rifled bore, at least a 16-inch or longer barrel and at least 26 inches in overall length.

SHOTGUN: firearm fired from the shoulder with a smooth bore, at least an 18-inch barrel and at least 26 inches in overall length.

SLINGSHOT: hand-held device manually drawn or held with elastic band attached to arms,
or attachment points for propelling stones or metal projectiles. Wrist-brace attachments and non-elastic projectile pouches are normal parts of a slingshot.

SMALL-GAME BIRDS: dusky, mountain sharp-tailed grouse; greater sage-grouse; white-tailed ptarmigan; pheasant; northern bobwhite, scaled, Gambel's quail; chukar partridge; greater prairie-chicken.

SMALL-GAME MAMMALS: cottontail rabbit; snowshoe hare; white-tailed, black-tailed jackrabbit; marmot; fox, pine, Abert's squirrel; black-tailed, white-tailed, Gunnison's prairie dog; Wyoming (Richardson’s) ground squirrel

OTHER SMALL GAME: ; prairie rattlesnake; com- mon snapping turtle.

TRAPPING: taking or attempting to take wildlife with a trap.

FOR SMALL-GAME MAMMALS

LEGAL SMALL-GAME HUNTING METHODS

1. Rifles or handguns.

NOTE: SMART RIFLES are prohibited, including any firearm equipped with a target tracking system, electronically controlled, assisted or computer-linked trigger or a ballistics computer. Any firearm equipped with a scope containing a computer processor is considered to be a smart rifle.NOTE: FULLY AUTOMATIC RIFLES are prohibited.

2. Shotguns no larger than 10 gauge. Shotguns cannot be capable of holding more than 3 shells in magazine and chamber combined.

3. Hand-held bows and crossbows.

4. Air guns and slingshots.

5. Hawking.

6. All live traps (only cage or box traps) placed on public lands must be labeled clearly with the trapper's Customer Identification number (CID), in a place that can be easily seen without needing to move the trap to see the label. Trappers who don't have a CID must legibly label the traps with the trapper's name. Live traps that aren't labeled properly may be confiscated by any wildlife officer. This law also applies to furbearers (below).

FOR SMALL-GAME BIRDS

(EXCEPT MIGRATORY BIRDS: SEE PAGE 6–7)

1. Rifles or handguns allowed for dusky grouse and ptarmigan. 2. Shotguns no larger than 10 gauge not firing a single slug.

Shotguns cannot be capable of holding more than 3

shells in magazine and chamber combined.
3. Hand-held bows and crossbows.
4. Air guns and slingshots allowed for dusky grouse and

ptarmigan. 5. Hawking.

FOR FURBEARERS

1. Any rifle, handgun, shotgun, handheld bow or cross- bow, live traps (limited to cage or box traps), air gun (pre-charged pneumatic air gun .25 caliber or larger for coyote and bobcat).

2. Use of bait. It must be made solely of plants or animals. Bait cannot contain metal, glass, porcelain, plastic, cardboard or paper. Wildlife used as bait can be carcasses or parts of legally taken furbearers, carp, shad, white and longnose suckers, and inedible parts of legally obtained game mammals, birds or game fish.

3. Electronic call devices.
4. You must check traps in person, at least daily. In lynx

recovery areas, or where lynx are, you must check traps every 24 hours. More on lynx: cpw.state.co.us/lynxre- search

5. Any accidentally captured live animals for which trap- ping season is open must be killed or released immedi- ately upon checking the trap.

6. Animals captured in live traps cannot be moved from the capture site and must be killed or released on site when trap is checked.

7. If wildlife (except Canada lynx, see No. 8 in this list) is ac- cidentally captured alive when trapping season is closed or is illegal for that species, you must release the animal immediately. You cannot kill it. If you find a dead animal in your trap, you must bring its carcass to a CPW officer or office within 5 days. Failing to do so is evidence of illegal possession of wildlife. Trappers who comply will not be charged with illegal possession.

8. If you accidentally capture a Canada lynx and it’s not injured, you must release it immediately and report it to CPW within 24 hours. If a lynx is accidentally injured, but not in your possession, you must report it to CPW within 24 hours. If you capture a lynx accidentally and injure it, take the lynx to CPW or a licensed veterinarian, and report it to CPW within 24 hours. If you accidentally kill a lynx, you must report it to CPW within 24 hours, and take the carcass to CPW within 3 days after the report. Failing to follow these rules is considered unlawful take and pos- session. You will not be charged if you comply with these requirements or use the plan’s best management practices to avoid accidentally taking a lynx. Guidelines available on the CPW website, search for Avoid Lynx Take.

9. On private land, artificial light is allowed at night to hunt beavers, raccoons, coyotes, bobcats, striped skunks and red, gray or swift foxes, with written permission of landowner or agent.

10. On public land, artificial light is allowed at night with permit from local district or area wildlife manager, to hunt raccoons, coyotes, bobcats, striped skunks, beavers and red, gray or swift foxes. Permits are valid for time and place specified.

a. Permits are not valid 24 hours before or during deer, elk or pronghorn rifle seasons, nor opening weekend of grouse, pheasant, quail and waterfowl seasons.

b. It is illegal to hunt with a light permanently attached to a vehicle, or to project light from inside a vehicle.

c. It is illegal to take furbearers within 500 yards of a dwelling, building, campground or other structure, or in areas that jeopardize human safety.

d. You must carry and show the permit while hunting if requested by a law enforcement officer.

e. CPW can deny a permit for management purposes.

f. Night-hunting permits are not issued for bobcat on public land in Canada lynx recovery areas or where lynx are. If a bobcat hunter kills a Canada lynx during bobcat hunting season, CPW will not issue any more night-hunting permits for bobcat for the rest of the calendar year in the recovery areas or where the lynx was killed. CPW also will revoke all night-hunting permits previously issued for bobcats.

ILLEGAL SMALL-GAME HUNTING METHODS

1. The use of toxicants, drugs, explosives, stupefying sub- stances or body grip devices, cable device traps, enclosed foothold traps, foothold traps, lethal cable device traps, and to hunt, kill, capture, injure or harass wildlife are illegal, except as allowed under Chapter W-17 or permit- ted by the CO Dept. of Agriculture.

2. Use of electronic calls is not allowed to hunt small game. (Electronic calls are legal to hunt furbearers.)

3. Use of any artificial light as an aid in hunting wildlife, ex- cept as in "Legal Small-Game Hunting Methods" (above) is not allowed.

4. Use live-action game cameras to locate, surveil, or aid or assist in locating or surveiling game wildlife in order to take/try to take game wildlife during the same or follow- ing day. This doesn't include game cameras that record photographic/video data and store such data for later use, as long as the device cannot transmit data wirelessly.

5. Use of bait to hunt small-game mammals, game birds and migratory birds is not allowed.

6. Use of visual lures, fresh meat baits, fish oil and anise oil lures to attract felids in lynx recovery areas or where lynx are found is not allowed.

7. Except when legally placed on private property by permit, it is illegal to set traps within 50 feet of either side of the travelled part of state or federal highways or county roads.

8. It is illegal to destroy or damage beaver or muskrat houses, dens or dams, except to maintain water flow or prevent property damage.

9. Contests involving furbearers (including coyote), black- tailed, white-tailed and Gunnison's prairie dogs, or Wyoming (Richardson's) ground squirrels are prohib- ited. A contest is any competitive event where money or other valuable prizes are awarded for the taking of these species. Certificates or similar tokens of recognition without significant monetary value are not considered valuable prizes. This does not apply to wildlife parks and field trials licensed by CPW.

MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING LAWS

LEGAL MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING METHODS

1. Shotguns cannot be larger than 10 gauge. They cannot be capable of holding more than three shells in magazine and chamber combined. They must be fired from the shoulder. To reduce capacity of shotguns that hold more than three shells in the chamber and magazine combined, the magazine must be cut off, altered or plugged with a one-piece filler that cannot be removed unless the gun is disassembled. Slugs are illegal to hunt waterfowl.

2. Hand-held bows are allowed only if the arrow or bowstring is not held or drawn mechanically. It is illegal to use bows on firing lines designated by the Parks and Wildlife Commission.

3. It is legal to hunt waterfowl in the open, from a blind or other concealed place (except a sink box). When camouflaged with vegetation from agricul- tural crops, camouflaging cannot result in exposing, depositing, distribut- ing or scattering grain or other feed.

4. Hunting is allowed from vessels (except sink boxes) with motors or sails if motor is off, and/or sails furled and forward movement has stopped. Hunt- ing is allowed from drifting vessels and those propelled by hand. Motorized vessels are only allowed to pick up dead or injured birds, or to put out and retrieve decoys.

5. It is legal to take migratory birds, including waterfowl, coots and cranes, on or over the following lands not otherwise baited: standing or flooded stand- ing crops; standing flooded or manipulated natural vegetation; flooded har- vested crop lands; where seeds or grains were scattered solely from normal agricultural planting, harvesting, post-harvest manipulation or normal soil stabilization practice; flooded, standing agricultural crops where grain is inadvertently scattered solely by a hunter entering or exiting an area, placing decoys or retrieving downed birds. It is also legal to take migratory birds, except waterfowl, coots and cranes, on or over the following lands not otherwise baited: where grain or other feed is distributed or scattered solely from manipulation of agricul- tural crops or other feed, or solely from normal agricultural operations. "Baiting" means the direct or indirect placing, exposing, depositing, distributing or scattering of salt, grain or other feed that could serve as a lure or attraction for migratory game birds to, on or over any areas where hunters are attempting to take them. "Baited area" means any area on which salt, grain or other feed has been placed, exposed, deposited, distributed or scattered, if that salt, grain or other feed could serve as a lure or attraction for migratory game birds to, on, or over areas where hunters are attempting to take them. Any such area will remain a baited area for ten days following the complete removal of all such salt, grain or other feed.

6. Hawking or falconry permitted.

7. Dogs, artificial decoys, duck calls or goose calls are legal, except recorded or electronically amplified calls or sounds. Recorded or electronically ampli- fied calls are legal to hunt common crows.

8. You don’t need a permit to have and transport plumage or skins of legally taken migratory birds for your use.

9. You don’t need a permit to have, dispose and transport feathers from wild ducks and wild geese legally killed, or from birds seized and condemned by wildlife authorities. It is legal to use feathers to make fishing flies, bed pillows, mattresses and similar commercial items, except for millinery or ornamental use.

10. IN LIGHT GOOSE CONSERVATION ORDER SEASON: Recorded or electronically amplified calls are allowed. Shotguns that hold more than 3 rounds in the chamber and magazine may be used in this season only. Hunting is allowed one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. A federal migra- tory bird stamp is not required, but a Colorado waterfowl stamp is. (See page 14 for season dates.)

11. THE MOST RESTRICTIVE STATE OR FEDERAL LAWS APPLY. See cpw.state. co.us/waterfowlhunting or www.fws.gov/hunting/whatres.html for a detailed summary of federal regulations on migratory bird hunting. More regulations also may apply to National Wildlife Refuges opened to hunting; go to www.fws.gov/refuges for details.

ILLEGAL MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING METHODS

1. Baiting is illegal (see description of baiting above, number 5). For informa- tion on federal baiting laws, go to www.fws.gov/le/waterfowl-hunt- ing-and-baiting.html. It is illegal to take migratory game birds and waterfowl by the aid of bait- ing, or on or over any baited area, if you know or reasonably should know the area is baited. It is illegal to place or direct placement of bait on or
next to an area to cause, induce or allow anyone to take or attempt to take migratory birds with the help of bait or over a baited area.

2. It is illegal to use any artificial light as an aid in hunting or taking wildlife.

3. Traps, snares, nets, rifles, pistols, swivel guns, punt guns, battery guns, machine guns and fish hooks, poisons, toxicants, explosives or stupefying substances are illegal.

4. It is illegal to use live, tame or captive ducks and geese as decoys. All tame, captive ducks and geese must be removed 10 days before hunting. They must be in an enclosure that substantially reduces the sound of their calls, and conceals them from the sight of waterfowl.

5. It is illegal to leave decoys or things used as decoys in the field or on water overnight on state wildlife areas.

6. You cannot hunt migratory birds on a federal reservation, federal land set aside as a wildlife reservation, breeding ground or refuge or federal land closed by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, except as permitted.

7. It is illegal to hunt migratory birds from, on or across a highway, road, trail, public or private right-of-way in national wildlife refuges. Stricter regulations may apply on wildlife refuges. Contact: Alamosa and Monte Vista NWR, 719- 589-4021; Browns Park NWR, 970-365-3613; Arapaho NWR, 970-723-8202.

8. IN THE AREAS BOUNDED on N by Wyoming; E and S by I-76, Hwy. 71, U.S. 36 and I-70; and W by the Continental Divide and Larimer- Jackson county line; and in Bent, Crowley, Kiowa, Mesa, Otero and Prowers counties:
a. It is illegal to hunt waterfowl within 50 yards on either side of center line

of a public road.
b. It is illegal to hunt waterfowl within 150 yards of a dwelling, including di-

rectly above it, without first obtaining permission from owner, occupant or person in charge of the dwelling.

9. PUEBLO COUNTY: It is illegal to hunt waterfowl within 150 yards of a dwelling, including directly above it, without first obtaining permission from owner, occupant or person in charge of dwelling.

10. You cannot kill, have, transport, import or export migratory birds, their parts, nests or eggs that were taken, bought, sold, transported, possessed or exported illegally.

11. It is illegal to have or transport live migratory birds or waterfowl, includ- ing wounded birds. You must kill migratory birds immediately after you injure them, and they become part of your bag limit.

12. It is illegal to buy, sell, barter or offer to buy or sell feathers or mounted specimens of migratory birds.

13. It is illegal to receive or have someone else’s migratory birds unless they are tagged as required.

14. SANDHILL CRANE HUNTERS: Whooping cranes are federally endangered and illegal to hunt. They may be in Colorado during sandhill crane season.

15. The most restrictive state or federal laws apply. See www.fws.gov/hunt- ing/whatres.html for more.

TAGGING, TRANSPORTING BIRDS

1. A carcass tag must be attached to wildlife requiring one.

2. Licensees must accompany wildlife not requir- ing a carcass tag (except as in No. 4).

3. One fully feathered wing or head must be attached to birds in transit until they arrive at hunter’s home or commercial processing facility.

4. To ship migratory birds, packages must be marked outside with name and address of sender, name and address of receiver and number of birds, by species. Licenses, a photo- copy of the license or carcass tag must accom- pany wildlife shipped by common carrier.

5. It is illegal to leave migratory birds anywhere other than at your home or with someone else for picking, cleaning, processing, permanent or temporary storage or taxidermy, unless the birds or package of birds have a tag attached. You must sign tags and include your address, total number and species of birds, date of kill and your hunting license number.

6. It is illegal to receive or have someone else’s migratory birds unless they are tagged as required.

7. Migratory bird preservation facilities:

a. If you have someone else’s migratory birds for picking, cleaning, freezing, processing, storing or shipping, you must have records showing the number of each species, date you received them, date birds were disposed of, and name and address of who received the birds.
b. You must keep records 1 year after the last entry.
c. You must allow people authorized to enforce this regulation to enter the facilities at reasonable hours to inspect records and premises.

8. Per week, beginning on Sunday, it is illegal to import more than 25 doves and 10 pigeons from a foreign country, or more than 10 ducks and 5 geese from a foreign country, except Canada and Mexico. Doves and waterfowl imported from Canada and Mexico cannot exceed Canadian and Mexican export limits. One fully feathered wing must stay attached to birds transported and shipped between ports of entry and someone’s home or a migratory bird facility. It is illegal to import someone else’s birds.

9. It is illegal to take, have, transport, import or export migratory birds, their parts, nests or eggs that were taken, bought, sold, transport- ed, possessed or exported illegally.

10. It is illegal to have or transport live migratory birds, including wounded birds. You must
kill migratory game birds immediately after recovering them.

11. No permit is required to have or transport plumage and skins of legally taken migratory birds for your own use.

12. No permit is required to have, dispose of
and transport feathers of wild ducks and
wild geese legally killed, or of birds seized by wildlife authorities. It is legal to use feathers to make fishing flies, bed pillows, mattresses and similar commercial items, except millinery or ornamental use.

13. It is illegal to buy, sell, barter or offer to buy or sell feathers or mounted specimens of migra- tory game birds.

BIRD SPECIES IDENTIFICATION

A fully feathered wing or head must be attached to all birds, except turkeys, doves and band- tailed pigeons, in transit to hunter’s home or commercial processor. For pheasants, a foot with visible spur can be substituted.

NOTE: While in the field or during transport, all dressed (not fully feathered) doves, including

Eurasian collared-doves, count against the daily bag and possession limit for mourning and white-winged doves during the Sept. 1–Nov. 29 dove season. Eurasian collared-doves must be fully feathered while in the field or during trans- port at all other times.

HUNTING INVASIVE BIRDS

EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVES, EUROPEAN STARLINGS AND HOUSE (ENGLISH) SPARROWS are considered in- vasive species in Colorado. Because of this desig- nation, these species may be hunted year-round. No license or Habitat Stamp is required to hunt invasive species; however hunters must have and carry with them a hunter education card.

Hunters may harvest any number of each of these species and by any method of take ap- proved for big- or small-game hunting. These species may be taken at night with the use of artificial light and night vision equipment.

Commercial hunting of invasive species is prohibited, as is receiving or attempting to re- ceive compensation by hunting these species.

Eurasian collared-doves must remain fully feathered while in the field or during transport, except when counted as part of the mourning or white-winged dove bag and possession limit during the dove season that runs from Sept. 1–Nov. 29.
See page 10 for season dates and bag limits.

HUNTING TERMS & DEFINITIONS: MIGRATORY BIRDS

AGGREGATE: Total number of animals allowed to be taken in one day, by one person, regardless of spe- cies.

DAILY BAG LIMIT: Maximum number of wildlife you can take in a day, including any eaten or donated during the day they're taken.

CENTRAL FLYWAY: East of the Continental Divide.

GEESE: All species of geese and brant. Light geese means lesser snow geese (including blue), greater snow geese and Ross’ geese. Dark geese means Canada geese, white-fronted geese, brant,
cackling geese and all other species of geese except light geese.

MANIPULATION: Alteration of natural vegetation or agricultural crops by activities that include, but
are not limited to, mowing, shredding, discing, rolling, chopping, trampling, flattening, burning or herbicide treatments. Manipulation does not include distributing or scattering grain, seed or other feed after removal from, or storage on, the field where grown.

MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS: Migratory birds included in conventions between U.S. and foreign countries to protect birds for which seasons are established. They are: waterfowl (ducks, including mergansers, and geese, including brant), mourning and white-winged doves, sandhill cranes, American coots, sora, Virgin- ia rail, Wilson’s snipe, band-tailed pigeons, crows.

NATURAL VEGETATION: Non-agricultural, native or natural plants growing from planting, or existing seeds and other propagules. This does not include planted millet. However, millet growing on its own after planting year is considered natural vegetation.

NONTOXIC SHOT: Any shot type approved to take migratory game birds according to 50 CFR 20.21 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). See page 8 for table and details.

NORMAL AGRICULTURAL OPERATION: Planting, harvest- ing, post-harvest manipulation or agricultural practice conducted according to 50 CFR 20.11 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

NORMAL AGRICULTURAL PLANTING, HARVESTING OR POST-HARVEST MANIPULATION: Planting or harvesting to produce and gather crops, or manipulation after harvest and removal of grain, conducted according to 50 CFR 20.11 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

NORMAL SOIL STABILIZATION PRACTICE: Planting for agricultural soil erosion control or post-mining reclamation conducted according to 50 CFR 20.11 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

PACIFIC FLYWAY: West of the Continental Divide.

POSSESSION LIMIT: Maximum number of wildlife you can have at any time, including in the field, in transport, at home or in storage.

SINKBOX: Raft or low-floating device with a depres- sion concealing a person below the surface of the water.