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Statewide Daily & Size Limits

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Some areas have different regulations. See Special Area Regulations for daily and size limits on specific areas.

SPECIES

DAILY LIMIT

(for areas without special regulations)

SIZE LIMIT

(for areas without special regulations)

Largemouth and / or Smallmouth Bass

6 (combined)

None

Spotted Bass

None

None

Channel and / or Blue Catfish (A)

15 (combined)

Only one Blue Catfish over 30″

Flathead Catfish (B)

10

20″ minimum

White and / or Black Crappie

37 (combined)

None

Striped Bass (C)

15

Only 5 may be 20″ or longer

Striped bass hybrids and / or white bass (C)

None

None

Trout (C)

See Trout Regulations

Walleye, Sauger and / or Saugeye

6 (combined)

18″ minimum

Paddlefish (C)

See Paddlefish Regulations

None

Alligator Gar (D)

1

None

(All species not listed have no daily or minimum size limits)

 

 

 

 

Black Bass (Largemouth, Smallmouth, & Spotted Bass)

Statewide Daily Limit:

  • Largemouth & Smallmouth – 6 (combined)
  • Spotted – None

Statewide Minimum Size Limit:

  • Largemouth, Smallmouth & Spotted – None

Check Special Area Regulations for areas with additional daily and size limits

Black bass is a general term referring to largemouth, spotted and smallmouth bass and their hybrids. The three species are similar, but can be easily identified. Since water clarity can affect the color of a fish, color is not a reliable way to tell the basses apart.

An easy way to tell these species apart is by the relationship of the eye and the mouth hinge. On a spotted bass, the mouth hinge lines up vertically with the back edge of the eye; on a smallmouth bass, the mouth hinge vertically lines up with the front edge of the eye; and on a largemouth bass, the mouth hinge vertically lines up well behind the back edge of the eye.

 

Large Mouth Bass.psd

Largemouth Bass

  • Mouth hinge well behind eye
  • State record: 14 lbs., 11 oz.
Smallmouth Bass.psd

Smallmouth Bass

  • Mouth hinge in front of eye
  • State record: 8 lbs., 3 oz
Spotted Bass.psd

Spotted Bass

  • Mouth hinge even with back edge of eye
  • State record: 8 lbs., 2 oz.

Tongue Patch: Another way to distinguish black bass is the presence or absence of a tongue patch. The majority of largemouth bass have no patch on their tongue, while smallmouth and spotted bass do have a tongue patch.

 

LMouthBass.ai

Most largemouth bass have no patch on the tongue.

 

LMouthBassTongue.ai

Smallmouth and spotted bass display a patch on the tongue.

 

 

 

 

 

Catfish

Statewide Daily Limit:

  • Channel and / or Blue Catfish combined – 15
  • Flathead Catfish – 10

Statewide Size Limit:

  • Channel Catfish – None
  • Blue Catfish – Only one over 30″
  • Flathead Catfish – 20″ minimum

Check Special Area Regulations for areas with additional daily and size limits

Oklahoma’s three most popular catfish species can be identified by either the shape of the anal fin or the shape of the tail. A channel catfish will have a curved anal fin, but the same fin on the blue catfish will be straight across the bottom. Both of these species have a forked tail. In contrast, a flathead catfish’s tail will not be forked.

 

Channel Catfish.psd

Channel Catfish

  • Curved anal fin
  • State record: 35 lbs., 15 oz.
Blue Catfish.psd

Blue Catfish

  • Straight anal fin
  • State record: 98 lbs.
Flathead Catfish.psd

Flathead Catfish

  • Tail not forked
  • State record: 78 lbs., 8 oz.

 

 

 

 

Crappie

Statewide Daily Limit:

  • 37 (combined white and / or black crappie)

Statewide Minimum Size Limit:

  • None

Check Special Area Regulations for areas with additional daily and size limits

Size and daily limits are the same for the small but tasty black and white crappie. Both types of crappie can appear very similar, so one way anglers can know the difference between the two species is to identify marking patterns or spots / bands on the side of the fish. A white crappie, the most abundant crappie in the state, will have distinct vertical bands of blue/gray spots, whereas a black crappie will have only a sporadic, unrecognizable pattern to its black spots. There is also a difference in the number of bony spines in the dorsal fin: white crappie will have 5 to 6, whereas, black crappie will have 7 to 8.

 

Black Crappie.psd

Black Crappie

  • No true pattern to black spots
  • 7-8 bony spines in dorsal fin
  • State record: 4 lbs., 10 oz.
White Crappie.psd

White Crappie

  • Distinct vertical bands of blue/gray spots
  • 5-6 bony spines in dorsal fin
  • State record: 4 lbs., 15 oz.

 

 

 

 

Striped Bass, Hybrids, & white bass

Statewide Daily Limit:

  • Striped Bass – 15
  • Striped Bass Hybrids and / or White Bass - None

Statewide Size Limit:

  • Striped Bass – Only 5 may be 20″ or longer
  • Striped Bass Hybrids and / or White Bass - None

Check Special Area Regulations for areas with additional daily and size limits

White bass, striped bass and striped bass hybrids offer great fishing opportunities around the state. The white bass can be identified by the distinctive arched back just behind its head. It also has only one tongue patch. The striped bass is not arched at the back and has two distinct tongue patches. It is also identified by the dark, usually unbroken lines on each side. The striped bass hybrid, which is a cross between the white bass and the striped bass, has a slightly arched back and has two tongue patches. The lines on a hybrid are usually broken.

 

Striped Bass.psd

Striped Bass

  • Back not arched
  • State record: 47 lbs., 8 oz.
  • Strong, unbroken dark lines

Striped Bass Hybrid.psd

Striped Bass Hybrid

  • Back slightly arched
  • State record: 23 lbs., 4 oz.
  • Some broken lines
White Bass.psd

White Bass

  • Arched back
  • State record: 5 lbs., 4 oz.
  • Faint lines, usually unbroken

Distinguishing White Bass

White Bass Mouth.psdWhite bass are also distinguished from striped bass and striped bass hybrids by the tongue patch. White bass have a single tongue patch, striped bass and striped bass hybrids have two tongue patches.

 

 

 

 

Trout (Rainbow & Brown Trout)

Statewide Daily Limit:

  • Rainbow Trout – 6
  • Brown Trout – 6

Statewide Minimum Size Limit:

  • None

Check Trout Regulations for areas with additional daily and size limits

Oklahoma’s two trout species can be easily identified. First look at the side of the fish. A rainbow will be iridescent, but the brown trout will have orange and red spots. The rainbow will also have black spots on its tail and a white belly. In comparison, the brown will have few or no black spots on its tail and a cream belly.

 

Rainbow Trout.psd

Rainbow Trout

  • State record: 10 lbs., 4 oz.
  • Black spots on tail
  • Iridescence on sides
Brown Trout.psd

Brown Trout

  • State record: 17 lbs., 4.6 oz.
  • Few or no black spots on tail
  • Orange and red spots on side

 

Walleye, Sauger, Saugeye

Statewide Daily Limit:

  • 6 (combined)

Statewide Minimum Size Limit:

  • 18″ minimum

Check Special Area Regulations for areas with additional daily and size limits

Oklahoma is fortunate to have these unique species of the perch family in many of its lakes. To identify them, first look at the spiny dorsal fin. The walleye will have no spots on this fin; the sauger will have distinct spots; and the hybrid of the two species, the saugeye, will have spots and bars in the webbing of its spiny dorsal fin. The color of the fish and the presence or absence of cheek scales may also help identify the difference.

Walleye.psd

Walleye

  • State Record: 12 lbs., 13 oz.
  • No spots on spiny dorsal fin
  • Few or no cheek scales
sauger.psd

Sauger

  • State Record: 5 lbs., 5 oz.
  • Distinct spots on spiny dorsal fin
  • Tan body with distinct brown blotches
  • Cheek covered with scales
Saugeye Hybrid.psd

Saugeye

  • State Record: 10 lbs., 10 oz.
  • Spiny dorsal fin with distinct spots and bars in webbing
  • Body gold with distinct brown blotches
  • Cheek covered with scales

 

 

 

 

Paddlefish

Statewide Daily Limit:

  • 1

Statewide Minimum Size Limit:

  • None

Check Paddlefish Regulations for areas with additional daily and size limits

Oklahoma has a thriving population of paddlefish, also known as spoonbills because of their long, rounded noses. Many paddlefish grow to weigh more than 50 lbs. Read the Paddlefish Regulations for all the information you’ll need to fish for Oklahoma’s prehistoric creatures!

Paddlefish.psd
  • Distinctive rounded, protruding nose.
  • State Record: 125 lbs., 7 oz.

 

Alligator Gar

Statewide Daily Limit:

  • 1

Statewide Minimum Size Limit:

  • None

Check Special Area Regulations for areas with additional daily and size limits

The alligator gar is uncommon in most of Oklahoma, but can be found in the Red River watershed. It has large, diamond-shaped scales and two distinct rows of teeth, and can reach a weight of over 100 pounds.

 

AlligatorGar.psd
  • State Record: 192 lbs., 1 oz.
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