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Wyoming County

Fishing Regulations Icon New York Fishing

Wyoming County

Water

Species

Open Season

Minimum Length

Daily Limit

Method

All waters except as listed below

Trout

April 1 through Oct 15

Any size

5 – with no more than 2 longer than 12″

Ice fishing permitted

Wiscoy Creek except section below

Trout

April 1 through Oct 15

10″

3

Oct 16 through March 31

Catch and release only

Artificial lures only

Wiscoy Creek from 0.5 mile upstream to 0.5 mile downstream of East Hillside Road Bridge

Trout

All year

Catch and release only

Artificial lures only

Clear Creek from mouth to Wyoming-Cattaraugus County line

Trout

April 1 through Oct 15

9″

5 – with no more than 2 longer than 12″

Oct 16 through March 31

Catch and release only

Artificial lures only

East Koy Creek, Cattaraugus Creek upstream of Springville Dam, Oatka Creek

Trout

April 1 through Oct 15

Any size

5 – with no more than 2 longer than 12″

Oct 16 through March 31

Catch and release only

Artificial lures only

Sauger Recovery In New York

Sauger are members of the true perch family, Percidae, and are similar to the closely related walleye in both appearance and habits. They were historically common in the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River, and Lake Champlain watersheds of New York, but now only a small remnant population in Lake Champlain may still exist. Sauger are currently considered critically imperiled in New York and a Conservation Management Plan (www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/92788.html) was developed to aid in their recovery. A plan objective is to establish a sauger population in the Allegheny River watershed, and this was initiated in 2014 via a stocking program that will be conducted through 2018. Initial follow-up surveys indicated excellent growth and survival of stocked fish.

Fishing for, and possession of, sauger is now prohibited in New York, so anglers need to know how to differentiate them from walleye where they may co-exist. Sauger can be identified by the unique three to four saddle-shaped dark brown blotches on their sides and the distinct black spots on the first dorsal (back) fin. Sauger also lack the white tip on the lower lobe of the tail fin that is common in walleye.