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Health Advisories

Fishing Regulations Icon New York Fishing

2018–2019 New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH)
Advisories for Chemicals in Sportfish

To help people make healthier choices about which fish to eat, the NYS DOH issues advice about eating sportfish (fish you catch). People can get the health benefits of fish and reduce their exposures to chemicals, or contaminants, by following the NYS DOH advice. The advisories tell people which fish to avoid and how to reduce their exposures to contaminants in the fish they do eat.

Types of advice

1) General advice: The general health advice for sportfish is that people can eat up to four, one-half pound meals a month (which should be spaced out to about a meal a week) of fish from New York State fresh waters and some marine waters near the mouth of the Hudson River. If there is no specific advice for a fresh waterbody, follow this general advice.

There is a general advisory because:

  • Fish from all waters have not been tested
  • Fish may contain unidentified contaminants
  • There are some chemicals (such as mercury and PCBs) that are commonly found in NYS fish

2) Specific advice: For some waterbodies in New York, NYS DOH issues stricter advice (eat a limited amount or none at all) because contaminant levels in some fish are higher. The specific advisories for fresh waters and the Hudson River are provided in the Health Advisory tables.

To be more protective, NYS DOH advises that infants, children under the age of 15 and women under age 50 should not eat any fish from many of these waterbodies. Chemicals may have a greater effect on the development of young children or unborn babies. Also, some chemicals may be passed on in mother’s milk.

Health advisories for marine waters

Health advisories for New York State marine waters around New York City and Long Island can be found on the NYS DOH website at: www.health.ny.gov/fish.

Tributaries and connected waters

The specific advice in the following tables applies to tributaries and connected waters if there are no dams, falls, or barriers to stop the fish from moving upstream or downstream. This is because chemicals remain in fish when they move from one waterbody to another.

Visit www.health.ny.gov/fish for the latest advice about eating your catch for all regions in the state.

New fish advisory maps by county

New detailed maps that show health advice for public access waters are available for eight counties: Albany, Dutchess, Orange, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady and Ulster counties. These are the first eight in a series that will be available over time: www.health.ny.gov/fish/maps.htm.

Women under 50 years of age and children under 15 years of age should not eat any fish from the waters listed below. All others should follow the listed advice. Also, see Special Advice on Lake Erie and Niagara River Above Niagara Falls. Advisories with changes are highlighted in red.

Water (County)

Species

Advice

Amawalk Reservoir (Westchester)

Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass over 16″

1 meal/month

Ashokan Reservoir (Ulster)

Smallmouth Bass over 16″ & Walleye

1 meal/month

Beaver Lake (Lewis)

Chain Pickerel

1 meal/month

Beaver River

  • Between High Falls Dam and Croghan Dam (Lewis)

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Big Moose Lake
(Herkimer & Hamilton)

Yellow Perch over 10″ and Lake Trout

1 meal/month

Black River (Jefferson) from Carthage State Dam to Herrings Dam

Carp

1 meal/month

Blue Mountain Lake (Hamilton)

Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Bog Brook Reservoir (Putnam)

Walleye over 21″

1 meal/month

Boyd Corners Reservoir (Putnam)

Largemouth Bass over 16″ & Walleye

1 meal/month

Breakneck Pond (Rockland)

Largemouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Brown Tract Ponds, Upper and Lower (Hamilton)

Largemouth and Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Buffalo River/Harbor (Erie)

Carp

Don’t Eat

Channel Catfish

1 meal/month

Canada Lake (Fulton)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″ & Chain Pickerel

1 meal/month

Canadice Lake (Ontario)

Lake Trout over 23″

Don’t Eat

Brown Trout, smaller Lake Trout

1 meal/month

Cannonsville Reservoir (Delaware)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″ & Yellow Perch

1 meal/month

Carry Falls Reservoir
(St. Lawrence)

Walleye

1 meal/month

Cayuga Creek (Niagara)

All species

Don’t Eat

Chase Lake (Fulton)

Yellow Perch over 9″

1 meal/month

Chenango River

Walleye over 22″

1 meal/month

Chodikee Lake (Ulster)

Largemouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Cranberry Lake (St. Lawrence)

Largemouth and Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Crane Pond (Essex)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Cross River Reservoir (Westchester)

Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass over 16″

1 meal/month

Dart Lake (Herkimer)

Yellow Perch over 10″

1 meal/month

Delaware Park/Hoyt Lake (Erie)

Carp

1 meal/month

Diverting Reservoir (Putnam)

Walleye

1 meal/month

Dunham Reservoir (Rensselaer)

Walleye

Don’t Eat

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Dyken Pond (Rensselaer)

Largemouth Bass

1 meal/month

East Branch Reservoir (Putnam)

Walleye

1 meal/month

Effley Falls Pond (Lewis)

Chain Pickerel &
Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Eighteenmile Creek, above and below Burt Dam (Niagara)

All species

Don’t Eat

Elmer Falls Pond (Lewis)

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Erie Canal Between Lockport and Niagara River (Erie/Niagara)

Carp

1 meal/month

Fall Lake (Hamilton)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″ and Rock Bass

1 meal/month

Ferris Lake (Hamilton)

Yellow Perch over 10″

1 meal/month

Forked Lake (Hamilton)

Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass, Lake Trout

1 meal/month

Fourth Lake (Herkimer & Hamilton) of Fulton Chain

Lake Trout

Don’t Eat

Francis Lake (Lewis)

Chain Pickerel over 20″

1 meal/month

Franklin Falls Flow/ Pond (Franklin & Essex)

Walleye

Don’t Eat

Freeport Reservoir (Nassau)

Carp

1 meal/month

Fresh Pond, Hither Hills State Park (Suffolk)

Largemouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Goodyear Lake (Otsego)

Walleye over 22″

1 meal/month

Grant Park Pond (Nassau)

Carp

1 meal/month

Grasse River (St. Lawrence)
Mouth to Massena Power Canal

All species

Don’t Eat

Great Sacandaga Lake (Fulton, Saratoga)

Smallmouth Bass & Walleye

1 meal/month

Halfmoon Lake (Lewis)

Yellow Perch

1 meal/month

Hall’s Pond (Nassau)

Carp and Goldfish

Don’t Eat

Herrick Hollow Creek (Delaware)

Brook Trout

1 meal/month

High Falls Pond (Lewis)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Hinckley Reservoir
(Herkimer & Oneida)

Chain Pickerel and
Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Hoosic River (Rensselaer)

Brown Trout over 14″

1 meal/month

Hudson River
Indian Lake, Town of Diana/Fort Drum (Lewis)

All species

1 meal/month

Indian Lake—Towns of Indian Lake and Lake Pleasant (Hamilton)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Irondequoit Bay (Monroe)

See Lake Ontario Advice

Kinderhook Lake (Columbia)

American Eel

1 meal/month

Kings Flow (Hamilton)

Largemouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Koppers Pond (Chemung)

Carp

1 meal/month

Lake Algonquin (Hamilton)

Chain Pickerel over 20″

1 meal/month

Lake Capri (Suffolk)

American Eel and Carp

1 meal/month

Lake Champlain (Whole Lake)

Lake Trout over 25″ and Walleye over 19″

1 meal/month

  • Bay within Cumberland Head to Crab Island

Follow advice above plus: American Eel

1 meal/month

Lake Durant and Rock Pond, Town of Indian Lake (Hamilton)

Largemouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Lake Eaton (Hamilton)

Yellow Perch over 10″,
Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Lake Ontario (Whole Lake)

Channel Catfish, Carp

Don’t Eat

White Sucker, Lake Trout over 25″, Brown Trout over 20″

1 meal/month

  • West of Point Breeze

White Perch

Don’t Eat

  • East of Point Breeze

White Perch

1 meal/month

(Note: harvest/possession of Niagara River, Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River American eel is prohibited per NYSDEC Regulations.)
Lewey Lake (Hamilton)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Lewiston Reservoir/Power Reservoir (Niagara)

Carp

Don’t eat

Limekiln Lake

(Hamilton & Herkimer)

Yellow Perch over 10″

1 meal/month

Lincoln Pond (Essex)

Largemouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Loch Sheldrake (Sullivan)

Walleye

1 meal/month

Loft’s Pond (Nassau)

Carp and Goldfish

1 meal/month

Long Lake, Town of Long Lake (Hamilton)

Northern Pike

1 meal/month

Long Pond, Town of Croghan (Lewis)

Splake over 12″

Don’t Eat

Lower & Upper Sister Lakes (Hamilton)

Yellow Perch over 10″

Don’t Eat

Lower Saranac Lake (Franklin)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Massapequa Reservoir/Upper Massapequa Reservoir (Nassau)

Carp and White Perch

1 meal/month

Massena Power Canal (St. Lawrence)

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Meacham Lake (Franklin)

Yellow Perch over 12″

Don’t Eat

Smaller Yellow Perch

1 meal/month

Smallmouth Bass

Don’t Eat

Northern Pike

1 meal/month

Middle (East) Stoner Lake (Fulton & Hamilton)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Mohawk River
  • Between Oriskany and West Canada Creeks (Oneida & Herkimer)

Carp

Don’t Eat

Largemouth Bass & Tiger Muskellunge

1 meal/month

  • Between West Canada Creek and Fivemile Dam below Little Falls (Herkimer)

Carp

1 meal/month

Moshier Reservoir (Herkimer)

Yellow Perch &
Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Mud Creek (Oneida)

Brown Trout, White Sucker

Don’t eat

Nassau Lake (Rensselaer)

All species

Don’t Eat

Neversink Reservoir (Sullivan)

Brown Trout over 24″ & Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Niagara River
  • Above Niagara Falls
  • Below Niagara Falls

Channel Catfish, Carp and White Perch

Don’t Eat

White Sucker, Lake Trout over 25″, Brown Trout over 20″

1 meal/month

(Note: harvest/possession of Niagara River, Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River American eel is prohibited per NYSDEC Regulations.)
North Lake—Town of Ohio (Herkimer)

Yellow Perch

1 meal/month

North-South Lake (Greene)

Largemouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Onondaga Lake (Onondaga)

Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass over 15″, Walleye, Carp, Channel Catfish and White Perch

Don’t Eat

Brown Bullhead and Pumpkinseed

4 meals/month

Smaller Smallmouth Bass, Smaller Largemouth Bass and all other fish not listed

1 meal/month

Osgood Pond (Franklin)

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Oswego River (Oswego)

  • Varick Dam at Oswego (Lock #8) to upper dam at Fulton (Lock #2)

Channel Catfish

1 meal/month

  • Mouth to Varick Dam at Oswego (Lock #8)

See Lake Ontario Advice

Pepacton Reservoir (Delaware)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″, Brown Trout over 24″ & Yellow Perch over 9

1 meal/month

Pine Lake (Fulton)

Largemouth Bass

1 meal/month

Polliwog Pond (Franklin)

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Raquette Lake (Hamilton)

Largemouth Bass,
Lake Trout

1 meal/month

Red Lake (Jefferson)

Walleye

1 meal/month

Ridders Pond (Nassau)

Goldfish

Don’t Eat

Rio Reservoir (Orange & Sullivan)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Rock Pond and Lake Durant—Town of Indian Lake (Hamilton)

Largemouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Rollins Pond (Franklin)

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Rondout Reservoir (Sullivan & Ulster)

Smallmouth Bass over 16″

1 meal/month

Round Pond—Town of Long Lake (Hamilton)

Yellow Perch over 12″

1 meal/month

Rushford Lake (Allegany)

Walleye

1 meal/month

Russian Lake (Hamilton)

Yellow Perch over 9″

1 meal/month

Sacandaga Lake (Hamilton)

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

St. Lawrence River
  • Whole river

Carp, Channel Catfish

Don’t Eat

White Perch, White Sucker, Lake Trout over 25″, Brown Trout over 20″

1 meal/month

  • Bay and cove east of S. Channel Bridge, near St. Lawrence/ Franklin Co. line

All species

Don’t Eat

(Note: harvest/possession of Niagara River, Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River American eel is prohibited per NYSDEC Regulations.)
Salmon River (Oswego)

  • Mouth to Salmon River Reservoir

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

(and Lake Ontario Advice)

Salmon River Reservoir (Oswego)

Largemouth &
Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Sand Lake—Town of Arietta (Hamilton)

Chain Pickerel

1 meal/month

Sauquoit Creek (Oneida)

Mohawk River to Old Silk Mill Dam (near New Hartford/Paris town line)

Brown Trout,
White Sucker

Don’t Eat

Saw Mill River (Westchester)

American Eel

1 meal/month

Schoharie Reservoir (Delaware, Greene and Schoharie)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″ & Walleye over 18″

Don’t Eat

Smaller Smallmouth Bass & smaller Walleye

1 meal/month

Schroon Lake (Warren and Essex)

Lake Trout over 22″, Yellow Perch over 13″ and Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Seneca River (Onondaga)

  • Downstream of Lock 24 at Baldwinsville

See Onondaga Lake advisories

Sheldrake River (Westchester)

American Eel

Don’t Eat

Goldfish

1 meal/month

Skaneateles Creek (Onondaga)

  • Seneca River to Skaneateles Lake Dam at Skaneateles

Brown Trout over 10″

1 meal/month

Smith Pond at Rockville Centre (Nassau)

White Perch

1 meal/month

Smith Pond at Roosevelt Park (Nassau)

American Eel

Don’t Eat

Carp and Goldfish

1 meal/month

Soft Maple Dam Pond and Soft Maple Reservoir (Lewis)

Rock Bass & Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

South Pond—Town of Long Lake (Hamilton)

Yellow Perch over 10″

1 meal/month

Spring Lake – Middle Island (Suffolk)

Carp and Goldfish

Don’t Eat

Spy Lake (Hamilton)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Stark Falls Reservoir (St. Lawrence)

Northern Pike over 26″

Don’t eat

Stillwater Reservoir (Herkimer)

Yellow Perch over 9″,
Smallmouth Bass & Splake

1 meal/month

Sunday Lake (Herkimer)

Chain Pickerel

Don’t Eat

Yellow Perch over 10″

1 meal/month

Susquehanna River

Walleye over 22″

1 meal/month

Swinging Bridge Reservoir (Sullivan)

Walleye

1 meal/month

Threemile Creek (Oneida)

White Sucker

1 meal/month

Titicus Reservoir (Westchester)

White Perch

1 meal/month

Tupper Lake (Franklin &
St. Lawrence)

Smallmouth Bass & Walleye

1 meal/month

Unadilla River

Walleye over 22″

1 meal/month

Union Falls Flow/Pond
(Clinton, Franklin)

Northern Pike, Smallmouth Bass, and Walleye

1 meal/month

Upper & Lower Sister Lakes (Hamilton)

Yellow Perch over 10″

Don’t Eat

Upper Chateaugay Lake (Clinton)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Upper Twin Pond (Nassau)

American Eel & Carp

1 meal/month

Valatie Kill

  • Between County Rt. 18 and Nassau Lake (Rensselaer)

All species

Don’t Eat

  • Between Nassau Lake and Kinderhook Lake (Rensselaer & Columbia)

American Eel, Bluegill and Redbreast Sunfish

1 meal/month

Weller Pond (Franklin)

Northern Pike

1 meal/month

West Branch Reservoir (Putnam)

Walleye

1 meal/month

Whitney Park Pond (Nassau)

Carp and Goldfish

1 meal/month

Willis Lake (Hamilton)

Smallmouth Bass

1 meal/month

Woods Lake (Hamilton)

Smallmouth Bass over 15″

1 meal/month

Advisories for the Hudson River and Tributaries

Women under 50 years of age and children under 15 should not eat any fish from the Hudson River
downstream of the Corinth Dam. All others should follow the advice listed below.

Location (chemicals of concern)

Don’t Eat

Eat up to one
meal per month

Eat up to four
meals per month

Upstream from Corinth Dam (mercury)

Follow Adirondack Region Advice

Corinth Dam to Dam at Route 9 Bridge in South Glens Falls (mercury and PCBs)

Smallmouth Bass over 14″ and Carp

All other fish species

Dam at Route 9 Bridge in South Glens Falls to Hudson Falls Dam at Bakers Falls (PCBs)

All fish species

Hudson Falls Dam at Bakers Falls to Federal Dam at Troy (PCBs)

Catch and release fishing only per NYS Department of Environmental Conservation regulations. Take no fish. Eat no fish.

Federal Dam at Troy to Rip Van Winkle Bridge at Catskill (PCBs)

All other fish species not listed at right (including Striped Bass and Walleye)

Alewife, Blueback Herring, Rock Bass and
Yellow Perch

South of Rip Van Winkle Bridge at Catskill (PCBs in fish and cadmium, dioxin and PCBs in crabs)

(Note: harvest/possession of Hudson River American eel for food and American shad is prohibited per NYSDEC regulations)

Channel catfish, Gizzard shad, White catfish, Walleye, Crab hepatopancreas and crab cooking liquid*

Atlantic Needlefish, Bluefish, Brown Bullhead, Carp, Goldfish, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Smelt, Smallmouth Bass, Striped Bass, White Perch

All other fish species

Blue crab meat*

(six crabs per meal)

Advisories for Lake Erie and the Niagara River
Above Niagara Falls (PCBs)

Fish species

Advice for Men Over 15
& Women over 50

Advice for Women Under 50
& Children Under 15

Rock bass, Yellow perch, Burbot

Eat up to 4 meals/month

Eat up to 4 meals/month

Carp, Channel catfish

Eat up to 1 meal/month

Don’t eat

All Other Fish

Eat up to 4 meals/month

Eat up to 1 meal/month

Fish Testing for Perfluorinated Chemicals (PFCs)

Water (County)

Advice

  • Beaverdam Lake (Orange)
  • Stream from Stewart State Forest to Beaverdam Lake (Orange)
  • Lockwood Basin/Masterson Park Pond (Orange)
  • Moodna Creek (Orange)
  • Recreation Pond (Orange)
  • Silver Stream (Orange)
  • Thayers Pond (Rensselaer)
  • Washington Lake (Orange)

Effective 7/24/17: Preliminary results indicate that fish from some waters in Newburgh and Hoosick Falls have elevated levels of PFCs, compared to fish from other waters.

Until testing is complete, NYS DOH recommends that people who fish these waters return their catch. Visit health.ny.gov/fish/hv for updates on these waters.

Adirondack and Catskill Region Advice for Women and Children

Some fish in the Adirondack and Catskill Region have higher levels of mercury than in other parts of the state. There is additional advice to limit or not eat certain kinds of fish from these regions for women under 50 and children under 15 because some fish tend to have higher levels of mercury.

  • Women under 50 and Children under 15 DO NOT EAT: yellow perch greater than 10″, northern pike, pickerel, walleye, large and smallmouth bass.
  • Everyone in the family CAN EAT up to 4 meals/month from Adirondack and Catskill waters of: yellow perch less than 10″, bluegill sunfish, brook trout, bullhead, brown trout, pumpkinseed sunfish, rainbow trout, rock bass and other fish.

Tips for
Healthier Eating

  1. Choose sportfish from waterbodies that are not listed and follow the advice in this guide.
  2. When deciding which sportfish to eat, choose smaller fish, consistent with DEC regulations, within a species since they may have lower contaminant levels. Older (larger) fish within a species may be more contaminated because they have had more time to accumulate contaminants in their bodies.
  3. To reduce exposures to mercury, avoid or eat less largemouth and smallmouth bass, northern pike, pickerel, walleye and larger yellow perch (e.g., longer than 10 inches) because these fish tend to have higher mercury levels.
  4. To reduce exposures to PCBs, dioxin, mirex, DDT, chlordane and dieldrin, avoid or eat less American eel, bluefish, carp, chinook and coho salmon, lake trout, striped bass, weakfish, white and channel catfish, and white perch, because these fish tend to have higher levels of these contaminants.
  5. When preparing sportfish, use a method of filleting the fish that will remove the skin, fatty material and dark meat. These parts of the fish contain many of the contaminants.
  6. When cooking sportfish, use cooking methods (broiling, grilling and baking) which allow contaminants from the fatty portions of fish to drain out. Pan-frying is not recommended. The cooking liquids and fat drippings of fish should be discarded since these liquids may contain contaminants.
  7. Do not eat the soft “green stuff” (mustard, tomalley, liver or hepatopancreas) found in the body section of crab and lobster. This tissue can contain high levels of chemical contaminants, including PCBs, dioxin and heavy metals.
  8. Anglers who want to enjoy the fun of fishing but who wish to eliminate the potential risks associated with eating contaminated sportfish may want to consider “catch and release” fishing.
  9. Space out your fish meals so you don’t get too much exposure to chemicals at any given time. This is particularly important for women and young children.
  10. Bacteria, viruses or parasites may be in or on fish. Keep harvested fish cold. Wear protective gloves when gutting, skinning and filleting. Wash hands and surfaces often when preparing fish, and keep raw foods separate. Cook fish and shellfish thoroughly before eating.

Information About Deformed or Abnormal Fish and Botulism in Fish and Waterfowl

Visit www.health.ny.gov/fish/additional_information.htm.

Good Sanitary Practices While Fishing and Handling Fish

Microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites are in all waters, and can be found on fish and crabs. These microorganisms may come from combined sewer overflows (CSOs), faulty septic systems, and animal waste. After heavy rains, levels of fecal contamination can be higher in waters. Assume that all waters can have fecal contamination even if you can’t see it. While fishing and handling fish, take the following precautions to avoid contact with microorganisms which can make you sick:

Fishing

  • If you see raw sewage, avoid fishing. Follow advice on any sewage-related signs.
  • Keep your hands away from your mouth, eyes, ears, and nose while fishing and cover open wounds to avoid contact with the water. This reduces the chances of getting sick from microorganisms that can enter your body through these pathways.
  • Wash your hands after fishing, especially before eating, and shower if you have had contact with the water.

Handling and Preparing Fish

Fish and crabs, even from waters with high levels of microorganisms, can be eaten if you follow these good hygiene practices:

  • Only keep fish that act and look healthy.
  • Wear nitrile, rubber or plastic protective gloves while gutting, filleting, and skinning the fish. Avoid directly handling and preparing fish when you have cuts or open sores on your hands.
  • Remove and discard the guts (internal organs) soon after harvest, and avoid direct contact with the intestinal contents.
  • Keep fish cool (with ice or refrigerated below 45°F or 7°C) until filleted and then refrigerate or freeze.
  • Wash hands, utensils, and work surfaces before and after handling any raw food, including fish.
  • Unlike PCBs, mercury and other chemicals, most microorganisms can be destroyed by cooking. Cook fish thoroughly until internal temperature is 145°F or until flesh is pearly and opaque and separates easily with a fork.

Additional Information

New York State Department of Health

www.health.ny.gov/fish

518-402-7800

800-458-1158

e-mail BTSA@health.ny.gov

For more information on contaminant levels in sportfish, contact:

NYS DEC, Bureau of Habitat

518-402-8920

Attention Anglers: Avoid Areas Containing Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

Consuming fish from areas with HABs may be harmful to your health.

  • Avoid areas that appear discolored, paint-like, or have the color of pea soup.
  • Don’t eat fish caught in these areas.
  • Rinse with clean water if exposed to HABs.

For more information about HABs and fish consumption visit: www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/77118.html and www.health.ny.gov/fish.