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The 2014 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Guide is now available!
To view the new guide, please download the pdf. Check back in the coming days as we work to put up the new 2014 website.

Below is content from the 2013 guide.

Protect New Jersey’s Waters

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Invasive Fish

Fish identification can be easy for species caught frequently, but tricky for species new to New Jersey waters. An untrained eye can mistake species that look similar.

Bowfin are native species, actually dating back 250 million years and should be released unharmed. However, snakeheads are invasive and should be destroyed and submitted to the Division of Fish and Wildlife for verification. Snakeheads have recently been found in the lower Delaware River and some of its tributaries.

 

BOWFIN – NATIVE

Short anal fin

bowfinlm_opt.jpg

 

SNAKEHEAD – INVASIVE

Long anal fin.

snakehead208_opt.jpg

 

 

AMERICAN EEL – NATIVE

American eels are a diadromous native species, using both fresh and marine waters during their lifecycle. These eels are found in nearly every waterbody in New Jersey. American brook lamprey are a harmless native species that serves as an indicator of clean substrate. The Asian swamp eel is an invasive species with documented presence in Silver Lake, a 10-acre waterbody located in Gibbsboro.

Pectoral fins present; no gill slits.

American-eel---Responsible-Angler.tif

 

 

AMERICAN BROOK LAMPREY—NATIVE

No pectoral fins; gill slits present.

brook-lamprey-Responsible-Angler.tif

 

 

ASIAN SWAMP EEL—INVASIVE

No pectoral fins; no gill slits.

swamp-eel-Responsible-Angler.tif

 

 

CHANNEL CATFISH—STOCKED

Although not a native species, channel catfish are stocked by Fish and Wildlife in select locations as a recreational and food species. The flathead catfish is considered an invasive species capable of causing ecological damage by out-competing other recreationally important species for food and habitat. Flatheads have been confirmed in the middle section of the Delaware River.

Upper jaw protrudes past lower jaw; tail deeply forked.

Channel-CatfishT.tif

 

FLATHEAD CATFISH—INVASIVE

Lower jaw protrudes past upper jaw; tail not deeply forked.

flathead_enlarged_opt.jpg

 

Water Chestnut

water-chestnuts-0113_opt.jpg

p32_Water-chestnut-seed-pod_revised_opt.jpg

Fan-shaped,
strongly toothed leaves. Nut-like fruit with four sharp spines.

photo: Pat Hamilton/NJDFW

 

 

 

Invasive Mussels—Zebra Mussels

Zebra-mussels_opt.jpgHow to Identify Zebra Mussels

  • Resembles a clam with a striped “D”–shaped shell, less than two inches long
  • Usually grow in clusters
  • ONLY freshwater mollusk that can firmly attach itself to solid objects
  • If found, keep the mussel(s). Note date and specific location. Immediately, call Dr. Peter Rowe, New Jersey Sea Grant Headquarters, (732) 872-1300 extension 31, or write prowe@njmsc.org.
 

Keep on Reporting

The most effective way to succeed in containing aquatic invasive species is to report each encounter. Anglers are reminded that possession or release of flathead catfish, snakehead, Asian swamp eel, brook stickleback, oriental weatherfish, green sunfish and warmouth, bighead carp, silver carp and grass carp (diploid) is prohibited. Anglers must destroy these species if encountered and submit specimen(s) to the Bureau of Freshwater Fisheries at (908) 236-2118 for north Jersey and at (856) 629-4950 for south Jersey. For photo I.D. confirmation, write us at njfwfish@earthlink.net.

Regulations in red are new this year.

Purple text indicates an important note.

Return to the eregulations.com home page
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Conservation Partner Advertisements: The New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife allows appropriate advertising in its annual regulation guides in print and online, in order to defray or eliminate expenses to the state, and support enhanced communications with New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife Constituents. Through a unique partnership with J.F.Griffin Publishing, LLC & eRegulations.com, ‘Conservation Partners’ have been established that pay for advertising in support of the regulations both in print and online. The New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife neither endorses products or services listed or claims made; nor accepts any liability arising from the use of products or services listed. Advertisers interested in the Conservation Partners program should contact J.F.Griffin/eRegulations.com directly at 413-884-1001,
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