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Hunt with an Apprentice

Hunting Regulations Icon New Hampshire Hunting

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Know someone who really wants to try hunting but hasn’t taken a Hunter Education class yet? Now they can be an Apprentice Hunter!

New Hampshire offers an Apprentice Hunting License to anyone who wishes to hunt, but who has not yet completed a hunter education program or is not able to provide proof of a previous hunting or archery license.

The N.H. Apprentice Hunting License allows a friend, family member or co-worker to hunt, for one year only, when accompanied by a properly licensed person who is 18 years of age or older. The fees for the Apprentice Hunting License are the same as for a resident or nonresident Regular Hunting License, Archery License, or nonresident Small Game Hunting License.

The apprentice hunter must purchase any other permits or licenses required for hunting (such as turkey, pheasant, muzzleloader, etc.). The properly licensed person accompanying the apprentice is fully accountable for any damage incurred or for any violations that may be committed by the apprentice while hunting. So, it’s a big responsibility, but you may end up creating a hunter and a future hunting buddy for yourself.

Take someone hunting this season; share the past and shape the future. Have fun, be safe and good hunting!

Report Feral Swine

Wild pig, feral hog and Russian boar are common names used to describe today’s free-ranging feral swine, which are now found in 39 states, including New Hampshire. Because this non-native invasive species poses extensive damage and disease threats, they are of significant concern to farmers, livestock producers, natural resource managers, animal health officials, hunters, naturalists, and the general public.

Feral swine can damage pasture and consume and trample crops. They devastate native habitat by impacting forest regeneration and contaminate water supplies. Feral swine can severely affect native animal and plant communities, especially sensitive species. They prey upon amphibians, reptiles, deer fawns, wild turkeys, grouse, and other ground nesting birds and their eggs. Feral swine will also out-compete native wildlife for food, such as acorns and beechnuts. They can transmit as many as 30 pathogens and 37 parasites many of which pose serious threats to humans, livestock, wildlife, and pets.

In New Hampshire, feral swine are considered escaped private property and may only be hunted with permission of their owner. Please contact USDA/APHIS-Wildlife Services (WS) immediately with feral swine sightings, possible sign or hunter harvests. WS is also interested in assisting with removal of feral swine and obtaining fresh blood and tissue samples from carcasses for disease surveillance. The results of this effort will help protect human health, agriculture and natural resources of New Hampshire. Learn more at wildnh.com/wildlife/profiles/feral-hogs.html.

Report feral swine to:

Tony Musante, Wildlife Disease Biologist

USDA/APHIS-Wildlife Services

59 Chenell Drive Suite 7

Concord, NH 03301

anthony.r.musante@aphis.usda.gov

603-223-6832

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Apprentice Basics

The Apprentice Hunting License is not valid to take moose, doesn’t apply to the 3-day nonresident small game license, and cannot be used as proof of a previous license when purchasing a hunting license in the future.

An Apprentice Hunting License may be purchased only once in the lifetime of the hunter. It is available only through Fish and Game headquarters in Concord.

Visit huntnh.com.