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Hunting on Private Property

Hunting Regulations Icon Nevada Hunting

Hunters Must Respect Private Property

Every year the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) receives reports of hunters trespassing, damaging private property and even releasing livestock from fences. Nevada is more than eighty percent public land, almost all of it open to hunting, but some sportsmen still mistakenly enter private property and should be more careful about trespassing.

“Most sportsmen are ethical and respect private property, but when we do get reports of trespassing or private property damage we take them seriously,” said Tyler Turnipseed, chief game warden for NDOW. “We find that nearly all of these problems can be avoided if people use a little common sense while hunting or recreating outdoors.”

The Nevada Department of Wildlife wants to remind everyone that hunting on someone else’s land is a privilege, not a right. Remember common courtesy can go a long way toward establishing good hunter-landowner relations in the future.

Tips to use when hunting on private property:

  • Access to and across private lands is a privilege granted by the landowner. Not all roads are public roads. Traveling on private roads without permission to access other lands is akin to someone walking through your house to reach a neighbor’s home.
  • Bring a good map showing private and public land ownership. Know where you are. Internet map sources may not be very accurate and there may be no cell service in rural areas.
  • Build good relationships with land owners by asking permission.
  • Leave gates the way you find them and make sure everyone in your party knows that. If a rancher wants a gate left open, it will be hung back on the fence, not lying on the ground.
  • Leave the land better than you find it – pick up all trash you find and take it with you.
  • Camp away from water sources for the benefit of wildlife and livestock.
  • Report hunter misconduct. Misbehaving hunters jeopardize the use of resources for all hunters.
  • Stay on existing roads.
  • When granted access, bring only the number of hunters expected by your host.
  • Respect locked gates, no trespassing signs and orange-painted gate posts. They all mean stay out.
  • Send a thank you note.