Choose your state

Alabama Alabama Hunting & Fishing

Connecticut Connecticut Hunting Connecticut Fishing

Delaware Delaware Hunting Delaware Fishing

Florida Florida Freshwater Fishing Florida Saltwater Fishing Florida Hunting

Georgia Georgia Hunting Georgia Fishing Georgia Parent/Teen Driving Georgia Drivers Manual Georgia Commercial Drivers Georgia Motorcycle Manual Georgia Alcohol & Drug Awareness Program

Idaho Idaho Big Game Seasons & Rules – 2015

Illinois Illinois Hunting Regulations – 2016-2017

Indiana Indiana Hunting Indiana Fishing

Louisiana Louisiana Hunting Regulations 2015

Maine Maine Hunting Maine Fishing Maine ATV & Snowmobile

Maryland Maryland Hunting Maryland Fishing

Massachusetts Massachusetts Hunting & Fishing Massachusetts Saltwater Fishing

Michigan Michigan Fishing

Mississippi Mississippi Hunting & Fishing

Nevada Nevada Hunting Nevada Big Game Hunting Seasons & Applications Nevada Fishing

New Hampshire New Hampshire Freshwater Fishing New Hampshire Saltwater Fishing New Hampshire Hunting New Hampshire ATV & Snowmobile

New Jersey New Jersey Freshwater Fishing New Jersey Saltwater Fishing New Jersey Hunting

New Mexico New Mexico Hunting Rules & Info – 2016-2017

New York New York Hunting New York Fishing

Ohio Ohio Hunting Ohio Fishing

Oklahoma Oklahoma Hunting Oklahoma Fishing

Oregon Oregon Big Game Hunting Oregon Fishing Oregon Game Bird Hunting

Rhode Island Rhode Island Freshwater Fishing Rhode Island Saltwater Fishing Rhode Island Hunting

South Carolina South Carolina Hunting & Fishing

Vermont Vermont Hunting & Fishing

Virginia Virginia Hunting Virginia Migratory Game Bird Hunting Virginia Fishing

Logo

Delaware Deer Harvest & Research

Hunting Regulations Icon Delaware Hunting

Deer hunting in the First State has come a long way since 1954 when that first year harvest topped out at 505 animals. It’s been said that many thought too many deer were taken that year and that the population could not sustain that sort of pressure. The graph shows that this was certainly not the case. Annual Delaware deer harvests now routinely top 13,500 animals. For additional harvest information visit www.fw.delaware.gov

White-tailed Deer Research

A deer research project launched in 2013 has begun to provide important information regarding the movement and survival rates of bucks across Sussex County. The project, a cooperation between the Division of Fish and Wildlife and researchers at the University of Delaware, has involved trapping and collaring of both juvenile and adult bucks for the last three winters. Last year, the project was expanded to include both adult does and newborn fawns. Deer capture efforts will continue through the summer of 2017, but preliminary data has given researchers a glimpse into the lives and deaths of Delaware’s most popular game animal.

Adult deer capture occurs during the winter, when deer are drawn to trap locations using piles of corn. A biologist then triggers a net that restrains the animals before they are quickly sedated. All deer receive 2 sets of numbered ear tags so they can be uniquely identified in the following years. Young males are given lightweight expandable collars, while adults get more advanced GPS collars. Females are affixed with specialized transmitters able to detect when they give birth the following summer. Researchers are then able to quickly locate and catch the newborn fawns before they can run. Fawns receive small collars made of elastic that break away before they reach adulthood.

Collared animals are monitored on a regular basis. If a researcher receives a signal that a deer is no longer moving, indicating the animal has died, they will walk into the location and determine the cause of mortality.
Not surprisingly, hunters are by far the largest source of mortality for adult deer. Rates of harvest have so far been greater on mature bucks however, suggesting hunters may be letting some younger bucks walk. Researchers are less confident about what is happening to newborn fawns though. With low numbers of natural predators, it is unclear if most of the state’s fawns reach adulthood, or if other sources of mortality fill in the gaps; questions researchers will begin to answer this summer.

Not only do collars provide information into survival of individual deer, but how they use the landscape as well. While some young bucks are content to spend their lives near where they were born, many leave the area in search of better resources or potential mates. Some bucks collared during the study moved between 15 and 20 miles before finding a new home! Others shifted their range a few miles during the summer, only to return to their original range the following fall. Once the study is complete, researchers will attempt to understand the underlying cause of these movements and how the different strategies may impact survival rates.

Hunters who encounter tagged or collared deer are encouraged to treat them exactly as they would have if the collar was not present. Selectively targeting or passing collared deer will bias survival estimates and negatively impact the results of the study. If you harvest or find a deer with a collar or ear tags, please call (302) 831-4621 to report the animal to University of Delaware researchers.

More information can be found on Deer Hunting.

Research conducted by: Jacob M. Haus, Ph.D., University of Delaware Graduate Research Assistant, Jacob L. Bowman, Ph.D., University of Delaware Wildlife Ecology Dept. Chair and Joseph E. Rogerson, Division of Fish & Wildlife Species Conservation & Research Program Manager

2015/2016 DELAWARE
DEER HARVEST
BY COUNTY AND
MANAGEMENT ZONE

New Castle

2,548

Kent

4,173

Sussex

7,960

1A

888

1B

425

2

813

3

626

4

512

5

628

6

852

7

1,347

8

874

9

834

10

722

11

1,339

12

882

13

785

14

679

15

747

16

1,073

17

655