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Waterfowl Hunting Regulations

California Bird Hunting

Summary of Waterfowl Regulation Changes for 2017-2018

  • Pintail bag limit decreased to 1 per day
  • White goose bag limit increased in the Colorado River Zone to 20 per day

Statewide and Zone Waterfowl Regulations

502. Waterfowl, Migratory; American Coot and Common Moorhen (Common Gallinule).

(a) Definitions.

(1) Dark geese. Dark geese include Canada geese, cackling geese, Aleutian geese and white-fronted geese (“specklebelly”).

(2) Large Canada geese. Large Canada geese include western Canada geese (“honker”) and lesser Canada geese (“lessers”).

(3) Small Canada geese. Small (about the size of a mallard) Canada geese include cackling geese and Aleutian geese. Both are white-cheeked geese nearly identical in appearance to Large Canada geese. Aleutian geese have a thin white neck ring and Cackling geese have dark breasts. Both species have a high-pitched cackle as opposed to the deeper “honking”.

(4) White geese. White geese include Ross’ geese, snow geese and blue phase of both species.

(b) Waterfowl Hunting Zones.

(1) Northeastern California Zone: In that portion of California lying east and north of a line beginning at the intersection of Interstate 5 with the California-Oregon state line; south along Interstate 5 to its junction with Walters Lane south of the town of Yreka; west along Walters Lane to its junction with Easy Street; south along Easy Street to the junction with Old Highway 99; south along Old Highway 99 to the point of intersection with Interstate 5 north of the town of Weed; south along Interstate 5 to its junction with Highway 89; east and south along Highway 89 to Main Street in Greenville; north and east to its junction with North Valley Road; south to its junction of Diamond Mountain Road; north and east to its junction with North Arm Road; south and west to the junction of North Valley Road; south to the junction with Arlington Road (A22); west to the junction of Highway 89; south and west to the junction of Highway 70; east on Highway 70 to Highway 395; south and east on Highway 395 to the point of intersection with the California-Nevada state line; north along the California-Nevada state line to the junction of the California-Nevada-Oregon state lines west along the California-Oregon state line to the point of origin.

(2) Southern San Joaquin Valley Zone: All of Kings and Tulare counties and that portion of Kern County north of the Southern California Zone.

(3) Southern California Zone: In that portion of southern California (but excluding the Colorado River zone) lying south and east of a line beginning at the mouth of the Santa Maria River at the Pacific Ocean; east along the Santa Maria River to where it crosses Highway 101-166 near the City of Santa Maria; continue north on 101-166; east on Highway 166 to the junction with Highway 99; south on Highway 99 to the junction of Interstate 5; south on Interstate 5 to the crest of the Tehachapi Mountains at Tejon Pass; east and north along the crest of the Tehachapi Mountains to where it intersects Highway 178 at Walker Pass; east on Highway 178 to the junction of Highway 395 at the town of Inyokern; south on Highway 395 to the junction of Highway 58; east on Highway 58 to the junction of Interstate 15; east on Interstate 15 to the junction with Highway 127; north on Highway 127 to the point of intersection with the California-Nevada state line.

(4) Colorado River Zone: In those portions of San Bernardino, Riverside, and Imperial counties lying east of the following lines: Beginning at the intersection of Nevada State Highway 95 with the California-Nevada state line; south along Highway 95 through the junction with Highway 40; continue south on Highway 95 to Vidal Junction; south through the town of Rice to the San Bernardino-Riverside county line on a road known as “Aqueduct Road” also known as Highway 62 in San Bernardino County; southwest on Highway 62 to Desert Center Rice Road; south on Desert Center Rice Road/Highway 177 to the town of Desert Center; continue east 31 miles on Interstate 10 to its intersection with the Wiley Well Road; south on this road to Wiley Well; southeast along the Milpitas Wash Road to the Blythe, Brawley, Davis Lake intersections; south on the Blythe Ogilby Road also known as County Highway 34 to its intersection with Ogilby Road; south on this road to Highway 8; east seven miles on Highway 8 to its intersection with the Andrade-Algodones Road/Highway 186; south on this paved road to the intersection of the Mexican boundary line at Los Algodones, Mexico.

(5) Balance of State Zone: That portion of the state not included in Northeastern California, Southern California, Colorado River or the Southern San Joaquin Valley zones.

(6) Special Management Areas

(A) North Coast. All of Del Norte and Humboldt counties.

(B) Humboldt Bay South Spit (West Side). Beginning at the intersection of the north boundary of Table Bluff County Park and the South Jetty Road; north along the South Jetty Road to the South Jetty; west along the South Jetty to the mean low water line of the Pacific Ocean; south along the mean low water line to its intersection with the north boundary of the Table Bluff County Park; east along the north boundary of the Table Bluff County Park to the point of origin.

(C) Sacramento Valley. Beginning at the town of Willows; south on Interstate 5 to the junction with Hahn Road; east on Hahn Road and the Grimes-Arbuckle Road to the town of Grimes; north on Highway 45 to its junction with Highway 162; north on Highway 45-162 to the town of Glenn; west on Highway 162 to the point of beginning.

(D) Morro Bay. Beginning at a point where the high tide line intersects the State Park boundary west of Cuesta by the Sea; northeasterly to a point 200 yards offshore of the high tide line at the end of Mitchell Drive in Baywood Park; northeasterly to a point 200 yards offshore of the high tide line west of the Morro Bay State Park Boundary, adjacent to Baywood Park; north to a point 300 yards south of the high tide line at the end of White Point; north along a line 400 yards offshore of the south boundary of the Morro Bay City limit to a point adjacent to Fairbanks Point; northwesterly to the high tide line on the sand spit; southerly along the high tide line of the sand spit to the south end of Morro Bay; easterly along the Park boundary at the high tide line to the beginning point.

(E) Martis Creek Lake. The waters and shoreline of Martis Creek Lake, Placer and Nevada counties.

(F) Northern Brant. Del Norte, Humboldt and Mendocino counties.

(G) Balance of State Brant. That portion of the state not included in the Northern Brant Special Management Area.

(H) Imperial County. Beginning at Highway 86 and the Navy Test Base Road; south on Highway 86 to the town of Westmoreland; continue through the town of Westmoreland to Route S26; east on Route S26 to Highway 115; north on Highway 115 to Weist Rd.; north on Weist Rd. to Flowing Wells Rd.; northeast on Flowing Wells Rd. to the Coachella Canal; northwest on the Coachella Canal to Drop 18; a straight line from Drop 18 to Frink Rd.; south on Frink Rd. to Highway 111; north on Highway 111 to Niland Marina Rd.; southwest on Niland Marina Rd. to the old Imperial County boat ramp and the water line of the Salton Sea; from the water line of the Salton Sea, a straight line across the Salton Sea to the Salinity Control Research Facility and the Navy Test Base Road; southwest on the Navy Test Base Road to the point of beginning.

Waterfowl Consumption Health Warnings

The California Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) determines whether a public health hazard may exist from consumption of waterfowl taken from certain locations in California based on laboratory testing data. The following advisories have been issued. The guidelines are based on risk estimates that assume long-term consumption; thus, occasional intake of duck meat slightly above the recommended quantitative limits is not expected to produce a health hazard.

Grasslands area (Western Merced County)

Because of elevated selenium levels, no one should eat more than 4 oz. of duck meat from the Grasslands area in any two-week period. No one should eat livers of duck from the area.

Suisun Bay (Contra Costa and Solano Counties)

Because of elevated selenium levels, no one should eat more than 4 oz. per week of (greater and lesser) scaup meat, or more than 4 oz. of scoter meat in any two week period. No one should eat livers of duck from the area.

San Pablo Bay (Contra Costa, Marin, Solano, Sonoma Counties)

Because of elevated selenium levels, no one should eat more than 4 oz. per week of greater scaup meat, or more than 4 oz. of scoter meat in any two-week period from the bay. No one should eat livers of duck from the area.

San Francisco Bay (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara Counties)

Because of elevated selenium levels, no one should eat more than 4 oz. per week of greater scaup meat from the central bay, or more than 4 oz. of greater scaup meat from the south bay in any two-week period. No one should eat livers of duck from the area.

(c) Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for American Coots, and Common Moorhens.

(1) Statewide Provisions

(A) Species

(B) Season

(C) Daily Bag and Possession Limits

American Coot and Common Moorhen

Concurrent with duck season(s)

Daily bag limit: 25, either all of one species or a mixture of these species.

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit

(d) Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Ducks and Geese by Zone.

(1) Northeastern California Zone (NOTE: SEE SUBSECTION 502(d)(6) BELOW FOR SPECIAL SEASONS AND CLOSURES.)

(A) Species

(B) Season

(C) Daily Bag and Possession Limits

Ducks (including Mergansers)

From the first Saturday in October extending for 105 days. (Oct 7 – Jan 19)

Scaup: from the first Saturday in October extending for a period of 58 days (Oct 7 – Dec 3) and from the fourth Saturday in December extending for a period of 28 days. (Dec 23 – Jan 19)

Daily bag limit: 7

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 7 mallards, but not more than 2 females.
  • 1 pintail (either sex).
  • 2 canvasback (either sex).
  • 2 redheads (either sex).
  • 3 scaup (either sex).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

Geese

Regular Season:

Dark geese from the first Saturday in October extending for 100 days. (Oct 7 – Jan 14)

White geese from the first Saturday in October extending for a period of 58 days (Oct 7 – Dec 3) and from the first Saturday in January extending for a period of 14 days. (Jan 6 – Jan 19)

Late Season: White-fronted geese from March 3 extending for 5 days. (Mar 3 – Mar 7)

White geese from the first Tuesday in February extending for 33 days. (Feb 6 – Mar 10)

During the Late Season, hunting is only permitted on Type C wildlife areas listed in Section 550-552, navigable waters, and private lands with the permission of the land owner under provisions of Section 2016, Fish and Game Code. Hunting is prohibited on Type A and Type B wildlife areas, the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complex, the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge, and any waters which are on, encompassed by, bounded over, flow over, flow through, or are adjacent to any Type A and Type B wildlife areas, the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complex, or the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge.

Daily bag limit: 30

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 20 white geese.
  • 10 dark geese but not more than 2 Large Canada geese (see definitions: 502(a)).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

(2) Southern San Joaquin Valley Zone (NOTE: SEE SUBSECTION 502(d)(6) BELOW FOR SPECIAL SEASONS AND CLOSURES.)

(A) Species

(B) Season

(C) Daily Bag and Possession Limits

Ducks (including Mergansers)

From the third Saturday in October extending for 100 days. (Oct 21 – Jan 28)

Scaup: from the first Saturday in November extending for 86 days. (Nov 4 – Jan 28)

Daily bag limit: 7

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 7 mallards, but not more than 2 females.
  • 1 pintail (either sex).
  • 2 canvasback (either sex).
  • 2 redheads (either sex).
  • 3 scaup (either sex).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

Geese

From the third Saturday in October extending for 100 days. (Oct 21 – Jan 28)

Daily bag limit: 30

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 20 white geese.
  • 10 dark geese (see definitions: 502(a)).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

(3) Southern California Zone (NOTE: SEE SUBSECTION 502(d)(6) BELOW FOR SPECIAL SEASONS AND CLOSURES.)

(A) Species

(B) Season

(C) Daily Bag and Possession Limits

Ducks (including Mergansers)

From the third Saturday in October extending for 100 days. (Oct 21 – Jan 28)

Scaup: from the first Saturday in November extending for 86 days. (Nov 4 – Jan 28)

Daily bag limit: 7

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 7 mallards, but not more than 2 females.
  • 1 pintail (either sex).
  • 2 canvasback (either sex).
  • 2 redheads (either sex).
  • 3 scaup (either sex).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

Geese

From the third Saturday in October extending for 100 days.(Oct 21 – Jan 28)

Daily bag limit: 23

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 20 white geese.
  • 3 dark geese (see definitions 502(a)).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

(4) Colorado River Zone (NOTE: SEE SUBSECTION 502(d)(6) BELOW FOR SPECIAL SEASONS AND CLOSURES.)

(A) Species

(B) Season

(C) Daily Bag and Possession Limits

Ducks (including Mergansers)

From the third Friday in October extending for 101 days. (Oct 20 – Jan 28)

Scaup: from the first Saturday in November extending for 86 days. (Nov 4 – Jan 28)

Daily bag limit: 7

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 7 mallards, but not more than 2 females or Mexican-like ducks.
  • 1 pintail (either sex).
  • 2 canvasback (either sex).
  • 2 redheads (either sex).
  • 3 scaup (either sex).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit

Geese

From the third Friday in October extending for 101 days. (Oct 20 – Jan 28)

Daily bag limit: 24

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 20 white geese.
  • 4 dark geese (see definitions: 502(a)).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

(5) Balance of State Zone (NOTE: SEE SUBSECTION 502(d)(6) BELOW FOR SPECIAL SEASONS AND CLOSURES.)

(A) Species

(B) Season

(C) Daily Bag and Possession Limits

Ducks (including Mergansers)

From the third Saturday in October extending for 100 days. (Oct 21 – Jan 28)

Scaup: from the first Saturday in November extending for 86 days. (Nov 4 – Jan 28)

Daily bag limit: 7

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 7 mallards, but not more than 2 females.
  • 1 pintail (either sex).
  • 2 canvasback (either sex).
  • 2 redheads (either sex).
  • 3 scaup (either sex).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

Geese

Early Season: Large Canada geese only from the Saturday closest to October 1 for a period of 5 days (Sept 30 – Oct 4) EXCEPT in the North Coast Special Management Area where Large Canada geese are closed during the early season.

Regular Season: Dark and white geese from the third Saturday in October extending for 100 days (Oct 21 – Jan 28) EXCEPT in the Sacramento Valley Special Management Area where the white-fronted goose season will close after December 21. (Oct 21 – Dec 21)

Late Season: White-fronted geese and white geese from the second Saturday in February extending for a period of 5 days (Feb 10 – Feb 14) EXCEPT in the Sacramento Valley Special Management Area where the white-fronted goose season is closed. During the Late Season, hunting is not permitted on wildlife areas listed in Sections 550-552 EXCEPT on Type C wildlife areas in the North Central and Central regions.

Daily bag limit: 30

Daily bag limit may include:

  • 20 white geese.
  • 10 dark geese

EXCEPT in the Sacramento Valley Special Management Area where only 3 may be white-fronted geese (see definitions: 502(a)).

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

(6) Special Management Areas (see descriptions in 502(b)(6) )

(A) Species

(B) Season

(C) Daily Bag and Possession Limits

1. North Coast

All Canada Geese

From November 7 extending for a period of 83 days (Nov 7 – Jan 28) (Regular Season) and from February 17 extending for a period of 22 days (Feb 17 – Mar 10)(Late Season). During the Late Season, hunting is only permitted on private lands with the permission of the land owner under provisions Section 2016, Fish and Game Code.

Daily bag limit: 10

Canada Geese of which only 1 may be a Large Canada goose (see definitions: 502(a)),

EXCEPT during the Late Season the bag limit on Large Canada geese is zero.

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit

2. Humboldt Bay South Spit (West Side)

All Species

Closed during brant season.

3. Sacramento Valley

White-Fronted Geese

Open concurrently with the goose season through December 21, and during Youth Waterfowl Hunting Days. (Oct 21 – Dec 21)

Daily bag limit: 3 white-fronted geese.

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

4. Morro Bay

All species

Open in designated area only from the opening day of brant season through the remainder of waterfowl season.

5. Martis Creek Lake

All species

Closed until November 16.

6. Northern Brant

Black Brant

From November 8 extending for 37 days. (Nov 8 – Dec 14)

Daily bag limit: 2

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

7. Balance of State Brant

Black Brant

From November 9 extending for 37 days. (Nov 9 – Dec 15)

Daily bag limit: 2

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

8. Imperial County

White Geese

From the first Saturday in November extending for a period of 86 days (Nov 4 – Jan 28)(Regular Season) and from the first Saturday in February extending for a period of 16 days (Feb 3 – Feb 18)(Late Season). During the Late Season, hunting is only permitted on private lands with the permission of the land owner under provisions of Section 2016, Fish and Game Code.

Daily bag limit: 20

Possession limit: triple the daily bag limit.

(e) Youth Waterfowl Hunting Days Regulations (NOTE: To participate in these Youth Waterfowl Hunts, federal regulations require that hunters must be 17 years of age or younger and must be accompanied by a non-hunting adult 18 years of age or older.)

(1) Statewide Provisions.

(A) Species

(B) Season

(C) Daily Bag and Possession Limits

Ducks (including Mergansers), American Coot, Common Moorhen, Black Brant, Geese

  1. Northeastern California Zone: The Saturday fourteen days before the opening of waterfowl season extending for 2 days. (Sept 23 – 24)
  2. Southern San Joaquin Valley Zone: The Saturday following the closing of waterfowl season extending for 2 days. (Feb 3 – Feb 4)
  3. Southern California Zone: The Saturday following the closing of waterfowl season extending for 2 days. (Feb 3 – Feb 4)
  4. Colorado River Zone: The Saturday following the closing of waterfowl season extending for 2 days. (Feb 3 – Feb 4)
  5. Balance of State Zone: The Saturday following the closing of waterfowl season extending for 2 days. (Feb 3 – Feb 4)

Same as regular season.

(f) Falconry Take of Ducks (including Mergansers), Geese, American Coots, and Common Moorhens.

(1) Statewide Provisions

(A) Species

(B) Season

(C) Daily Bag and Possession Limits

Ducks (including Mergansers), Geese, American Coot and Common Moorhen

  1. Northeastern California Zone. Open concurrently with duck season through January 14, 2018. (Oct 7 – Jan 14)
  2. Balance of State Zone. Open concurrently with duck season and February 3-4, 2018 EXCEPT in the North Coast Special Management Area where the falconry season for geese runs concurrently with the season for Small Canada geese (see 502(d)(6)). (Oct 21 – Jan 28 & Feb 3 – Feb 4)
  3. Southern San Joaquin Valley Zone. Open concurrently with duck season and January 29-31, 2018. Goose hunting in this zone by means of falconry is not permitted. (Oct 21 – Jan 31)
  4. Southern California Zone. Open concurrently with duck season and January 29-February 2, 2018. EXCEPT in the Imperial County Special Management Area where the falconry season for geese runs concurrently with the season for white geese. (Oct 21 – Jan 31 & Feb 1 – Feb 2)
  5. Colorado River Zone. Open concurrently with duck season and January 29 through February 1, 2018. Goose hunting in this zone by means of falconry is not permitted. Federal regulations require that California’s hunting regulations conform to those of Arizona, where goose hunting by means of falconry is not permitted. (Oct 20 – Jan 31 & Feb 1)

Daily bag limit: 3

Daily bag limit makeup:

  • Either all of 1 species or a mixture of species allowed for take.

Possession limit: 9

Report Waterfowl Mortality

Certain habitat conditions may increase the possibility of disease outbreaks in waterfowl and other waterbirds. Two of the most common diseases of waterfowl include avian botulism and avian cholera. These outbreaks can result in the death of many birds.

CDFW tries to document disease outbreaks in waterfowl in California. If you observe greater than 5 sick, dead, or dying waterfowl in the same location you can report your findings to the CDFW Wildlife Investigations Lab at (916) 358-2790 or online: https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Laboratories/WildlifeInvestigations/Monitoring/MortalityReport.aspx

Youth and Junior Waterfowl Hunts for the 2017-18 Season

HUNT

DATES

DETAILS

HOW TO APPLY

Northeastern Zone

Federal Youth Waterfowl Hunt Days

9/23/2017

9/24/2017

Open to waterfowl hunters age 17 or under. Federal refuges and State wildlife areas (except Butte Valley, Shasta Valley, and Willow Creek) are open for youth hunters.

Contact the wildlife area you wish to hunt for details.

Sacramento NWR

Special Junior Hunt

12/2/2017

All blinds are reserved for junior hunters. Hunters must have a valid junior hunting license to apply.

Use a post card to apply directly to the USFWS. For information visit: fws.gov/refuge/Sacramento/visit/hunting.html

Delevan NWR

Special Junior Hunt

12/9/2017

All blinds are reserved for junior hunters. Hunters must have a valid junior hunting license to apply.

Use a post card to apply directly to the USFWS. For information visit: fws.gov/refuge/Sacramento/visit/hunting.html

Southern San Joaquin Valley, Southern California and Balance of State zones Federal Youth Waterfowl Hunt Days

2/3/2018

2/4/2018

Open to waterfowl hunters age 17 or under. Most federal refuges and state wildlife areas are open for youth hunters.

Submit a season-long application or a multiple-choice reservation application for these dates online, at a license agent or a CDFW license sales office.

§505. Decoys.

The use of live birds as decoys is prohibited.

§506. Shooting Hours.

Shooting hours for migratory game birds, including mourning doves, white-winged doves, band-tailed pigeons, American coots, common moorhens, common snipe (jacksnipe), and waterfowl for all of California shall be from one- half hour before sunrise to sunset.

Exception: In areas open to hunting on, over or adjacent to the waters of Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo County, the shooting time shall be from 7:00 a.m. to sunset.

§507. Provisions Related to the Taking of Migratory Game Birds

(as defined in Section 502 but also includes mourning doves, white-winged doves, band-tailed pigeons, and snipe.

(a) Authorized Methods

Only the following methods may be used to take migratory game birds:

(1) Falconry.

(2) Bow and Arrows or Crossbows. Only arrows or crossbow bolts with flu-flu fletching may be used except that conventionally fletched arrows may be used to take waterfowl sitting on the water from scullboats or similar watercraft.

(3) Muzzle-loading Shotguns.

(4) Shotguns 10 Gauge or Smaller. Shotguns 10 gauge or smaller using shot shells only and incapable of holding more than three shells in the magazine and chamber combined may be used, except no shotgun larger than 12 gauge shall be used in areas open to hunting on, over or adjacent to the waters of Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo County. If a plug is used to reduce the capacity of a magazine to fulfill the requirements of this section, the plug must be of one piece construction incapable of removal without disassembling the gun. Shotgun shells may not be used or possessed that contain shot size larger than No. BB in lead or T shot in steel or other nontoxic shot approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. All shot shall be loose in the shell.

(b) Use of Dogs.

Dogs may be used to take and retrieve migratory game birds.

(c) Prohibition on Electronically operated Devices.

Electronic or mechanically-operated calling or sound-reproducing devices are prohibited when attempting to take migratory game birds. It is unlawful to use devices that are either electronically-powered, or activated by anything other than natural wind, to directly or indirectly cause rotation of decoy wings or blades that simulate wings, when attempting to take waterfowl between the start of the season and November 30th.

(d) Live Decoy Prohibition.

The use of live decoys is prohibited when attempting to take migratory game birds.

§507.1 Nontoxic Shot Requirement for Waterfowl, American Coot and Common Moorhen Hunting.

Only bismuth-tin, steel, copper-plated steel, nickel-plated steel, tin-plated steel, zinc-plated steel, zinc chloride-plated steel, zinc chromate plated steel, iron-tungsten, iron-tungsten-nickel, tungsten-bronze, tungsten-iron-copper-nickel, tungsten-matrix, tungsten-polymer, tungsten-tin-iron, tungsten-tin-bismuth, tungsten-tin-iron-nickel, and tungsten-iron-polymer or other nontoxic shot approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service may be used or possessed for waterfowl, American coot and common moorhen hunting statewide.

NOTE: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reviews and may approve applications for other types of non-toxic shot throughout the year. Other non-toxic shot types that may have been approved after the publication of this booklet may be found at: https://www.fws.gov/birds/bird-enthusiasts/hunting/nontoxic.php

§507.5. Scull Boats.

Migratory game birds may not be taken by a scull boat or similar watercraft while under motorized power. The motor shall be removed from its mountings before any take or approach is attempted.

This section shall not prohibit shooting migratory game birds from scull boats or similar watercraft with motor attached if beached or anchored; nor shall it prohibit the use of a motor for the sole purpose of picking up dead or injured birds.

§509. Concurrence with Federal Regulations.

(a) The regulations adopted by the United States through its Secretary of Interior under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, as amended annually in Part 10, subparts A and B, and Part 20, Title 50, Code of Federal Regulations, are hereby adopted and made a part of this Title 14 except where said federal regulations are less restrictive than the provisions of Chapter 7 of this Title 14 (sections 500-509), the provisions of Chapter 7 prevail.

(b) Any violations of the regulations adopted pursuant to subsection (a) are violations of this section.

(c) It shall be unlawful for any person aged sixteen years or older to take any migratory waterfowl unless at the time of such taking the person carries in his or her immediate possession an unexpired Federal migratory-bird hunting and conservation stamp validated by his or her signature written by him or herself in ink across the face of the stamp prior to any taking of such birds.

The Case for Non-Toxic Shot…

  • Lead is toxic and there are effective and affordable alternatives to lead shot.
  • Many hunters who regularly access state and federal land already use non-toxic shot.
  • Science has proven beyond doubt that exposure to lead is harmful, resulting in restrictions on the use of lead in gasoline and paints as well as restricting imports of products containing lead.
  • Because of its toxicity, lead shot has been illegal to use for waterfowl hunting nationwide since 1991.
  • There is a growing body of evidence that lead shot from shotgun shells is a direct, contributing factor to wildlife mortality and leads to secondary poisoning. More than 100 species of upland birds, waterfowl and raptors are known to have ingested lead shot.
  • At least 15 international studies, eight of them in Canada, have linked lead shot in game animals to higher levels of lead in people who eat those game animals.
  • Effective non-toxic loads are now increasingly available and cost about as much as a box of premium lead.
  • Studies have demonstrated that steel shot, the most commonly available alternative and the least expensive, is effective when hunting waterfowl. Steel is also an effective pheasant load.
  • Hunters are encouraged to consider using non-toxic shot for all of their upland game hunting. Using non-toxic shot also eliminates the potential risk of ingesting lead in game consumed by hunters and their families.

(Revised and reprinted with permission from: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources)